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SARS-CoV-2 virus particles, shown in red, have heavily infected a cell in this colorized scanning electron micrograph. SARS-CoV-2 is the virus that causes COVID-19. NIAID/NIH/Flickr hide caption

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NIAID/NIH/Flickr

How COVID-19 Attacks The Brain And May Cause Lasting Damage

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In 2016, dozens of people associated with the U.S. Embassy in Havana began reporting symptoms of what became known as "Havana syndrome." Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters hide caption

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Alexandre Meneghini/Reuters

Brain Scans Find Differences But No Injury In U.S. Diplomats Who Fell Ill In Cuba

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Army veteran Chris Riga survived multiple blast injuries in deployments in Afghanistan and Iraq. He rearranges sticky notes on his desk to assist him in remembering tasks he has to do throughout the day at his job as patient experience coordinator at the Northampton VA Medical Center in Leeds, Mass. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

'What Does War Do To An Entire Person?' — VA Studies Veterans With Blast Injuries

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Sarah Gonzales for NPR

Marines Who Fired Rocket Launchers Now Worry About Their Brains

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Concussions from domestic violence are sometimes overlooked in patient care. MarkCoffeyPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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MarkCoffeyPhoto/Getty Images

Domestic Violence's Overlooked Damage: Concussion And Brain Injury

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Brain MRI BSIP/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images

A Tiny Pulse Of Electricity Can Help The Brain Form Lasting Memories

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A saliva test allowed scientists to accurately predict how long concussion symptoms would last in children. technotr/Getty Images hide caption

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technotr/Getty Images

Spit Test May Reveal The Severity Of A Child's Concussion

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U.S. Marines march in the annual Veterans Day Parade along Fifth Avenue in 2014 in New York City. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

For Veterans, Trauma Of War Can Persist In Struggles With Sexual Intimacy

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Months after a concussion or other traumatic brain injury, you may sleep more hours, but the sleep isn't restorative, a study suggests. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

A Concussion Can Lead To Sleep Problems That Last For Years

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Bob Woodruff in 2014. Jemal Countess/Getty Images hide caption

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Jemal Countess/Getty Images

ABC's Bob Woodruff: The Unexpected Life

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An MRI scan shows Bryan Arling's brain from above. The white-looking fluid is a subdural hematoma, or a collection of blood, that pushed part of his brain away from the skull, causing headaches and slowing his decision-making. Courtesy of Dr. Ingrid Ott, Washington Radiology Associates hide caption

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Courtesy of Dr. Ingrid Ott, Washington Radiology Associates

You don't have to be outdoors to be hurt or injured by a nearby lightning strike, like this one in New Mexico. The pain for survivors can be lifelong. Marko Korosec/Barcroft Media/Landov hide caption

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Marko Korosec/Barcroft Media/Landov

'When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors' To Best Avoid Lightning's Pain

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Germany's Alexandra Popp and the U.S.'s Morgan Brian collide during a World Cup semifinal in June. Both were injured, but continued to play. Brad Smith//ISI/Corbis hide caption

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Brad Smith//ISI/Corbis

Nurses Katherine Malinak and Amy Young lift Louis DeMattio, a stroke patient, out of his hospital bed using a ceiling-mounted lift at the Cleveland Clinic. Dustin Franz for NPR hide caption

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Dustin Franz for NPR

People With Brain Injuries Heal Faster If They Get Up And Get Moving

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Russell Cobb/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Seeing What Isn't There: Inside Alzheimer's Hallucinations

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Undiagnosed Brain Injury Is Behind Soldier's Suicidal Thoughts

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San Francisco 49ers linebacker Chris Borland (50) is seen here in a game last year against the New York Giants. Borland, who had two interceptions in that game, has announced that he is retiring from the NFL after his rookie season. Chris Szagola/CSM/Landov hide caption

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Chris Szagola/CSM/Landov

Former Army Sgt. Ryan Sharp sat down with his father, Kirk Sharp, to talk about what happened when Ryan returned home after two tours in Iraq. StoryCorps hide caption

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StoryCorps

Behind A Soldier's Suicidal Thoughts, An Unknown Brain Injury

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