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President Obama is renaming Alaska's Mount McKinley in an effort to strengthen cooperation between the government and Alaska Native tribes. The peak is returning to its traditional name, Denali. Al Grillo/AP hide caption

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Al Grillo/AP

President Obama has stayed neutral in the race to replace him, but as rumors swirl that Vice President Biden could jump in, a White House spokesman said Monday it's possible Obama will endorse. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Obama Could Make An Endorsement In Primary Between Clinton, Biden

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An honor guard from the South Carolina Highway Patrol lowers the Confederate battle flag, removing it from the Capitol grounds on July 10. John Bazemore/AP hide caption

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John Bazemore/AP

Can The South Carolina GOP Get Rid Of Its Confederate Ghosts?

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Members of the media are kept behind a moving rope line as Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton marches in a Fourth of July parade in Gorham, N.H. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

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Robert F. Bukaty/AP

President Obama signs a presidential memorandum in March of 2014 that directed the Department of Labor construct a new set of overtime rules, with the goal of making more employees eligible for overtime pay. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

With less than two years left in his presidency, President Obama has been less scripted and appears less confined by politics. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

A Less-Restrained Obama Finally Says 'Bucket'

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American Journalist James Foley, pictured in 2011. Foley's beheading at the hands of the Islamic State militant group has forced a debate over how the U.S. balances its policy of not paying ransoms. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

Obama Administration To Shift Ransom-For-Hostages Rules

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