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People collect drinking water from pipes fed by an underground spring last week in Cape Town. Next month, the city will slash its individual daily water consumption limit to 13.2 gallons, the mayor said, as the city battles its worst drought in a century. Rodger Bosch /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rodger Bosch /AFP/Getty Images

President Trump listens as Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg speaks at a joint news conference Wednesday. At an Oval Office meeting on immigration policy, Trump said the U.S. should want more people from countries like Norway, disparaging Haiti and what he called "shithole countries" in Africa. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

'Racist' And 'Shameful': How Other Countries Are Responding To Trump's Slur

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Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe (left) greets South African President Nelson Mandela in Harare, Zimbabwe, in 1998. The two men have shaped their countries in dramatically different ways. Rob Cooper/AP hide caption

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Rob Cooper/AP

Former anti-apartheid activist Mohamed Timol, brother of the late Ahmed Timol, holds up a copy of the book "Timol: A Quest for Justice" at the judgment proceedings in Pretoria on Thursday. Gulshan Khan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Gulshan Khan/AFP/Getty Images

South Africa granted diplomatic immunity to Zimbabwean first lady Grace Mugabe after she was accused of assaulting a young woman at a Johannesburg hotel. Above, Mugabe addresses a youth rally in June. Jekesai Njikizana/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jekesai Njikizana/AFP/Getty Images

South African model Gabriella Engels, who says she was assaulted by Zimbabwean first lady Grace Mugabe, attends a press conference at the civil rights organization AfriForum on Thursday. Phill Magakoe /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Phill Magakoe /AFP/Getty Images

Supporters of the opposition Democratic Alliance march against President Jacob Zuma ahead of the motion of a no confidence vote against him in Cape Town, South Africa. Brenton Geach/Getty Images hide caption

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Brenton Geach/Getty Images

Zuma Survives (Another) No-Confidence Vote In South Africa's Parliament

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Linda Fortune's family was forced out of District Six when she was 22. Growing up, the family often ate crayfish her father caught as a hobby. "If you had an overabundance of fish, you would share it with the neighbors," she recalls. Alan Greenblatt/NPR hide caption

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Alan Greenblatt/NPR

South African President F.W. de Klerk and Nelson Mandela jointly received the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo, Norway, in 1993 for negotiating an end to apartheid. Earlier that year, de Klerk announced that South Africa had dismantled six nuclear weapons, becoming to first country to get rid of nuclear bombs that it had built. Gerard Julien/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Gerard Julien/AFP/Getty Images

Giving Up Nuclear Weapons: It's Rare, But It's Happened

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