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Grace Mugabe, then Zimbabwe's first lady, greets supporters at a rally last year in the city of Lupane. South African police now want to see her arrested for allegedly assaulting her son's girlfriend. Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP hide caption

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Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP

An artist's reconstruction of Ledumahadi mafube, which means "a giant thunderclap at dawn," foraging during the early Jurassic in South Africa. Viktor Radermacher, University of the Witwatersrand hide caption

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Viktor Radermacher, University of the Witwatersrand

Bones Reveal The Brontosaurus Had An Older, Massive Cousin In South Africa

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South African leaders pushed back against President Trump's tweet about "land and farm seizures and expropriations and the large scale killing of farmers." Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

High-speed tracking dogs have been a game-changer in the fight against rhino poaching in South Africa. Their success depends on their ability to work as a team, which means they sleep and eat in the pack-sized enclosures shown above. David Fuchs hide caption

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David Fuchs

To Combat Rhino Poaching, Dogs Are Giving South African Park Rangers A Crucial Assist

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In 1994 Nelson Mandela revisited the cell at Robben Island prison where he was jailed for more than two decades. Louise Gubb/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Louise Gubb/Corbis via Getty Images

Nelson Mandela's Prison Letters: 'One Day I Will Be Back At Home'

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Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, in Johannesburg in December 2017, made the doek, a head covering and symbol of African womanhood, her trademark. Mujahid Safodien/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mujahid Safodien/AFP/Getty Images