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Rajesh Jantilal/AFP/Getty Images

Ladysmith Black Mambazo to South Africans: Stop Attacking Immigrants

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Zulu King Goodwill Zwelithini, center, arrives at a Zulu gathering at a stadium in Durban, South Africa. Six people have died in anti-immigrant violence in the city in recent weeks, and another death has been reported in Johannesburg; Zwelithini is accused of inciting the attacks with incendiary comments, but says his remarks were taken out of context. AP hide caption

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AP

South Africa's Xenophobic Attacks 'Vile,' Says Zulu King Accused Of Inciting Them

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Polina, 37, rests in a hospital bed in St. Petersburg, Russia, in 2011. She is severely malnourished and suffers from numerous diseases, including tuberculosis, hepatitis C and HIV. Misha Friedman hide caption

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Misha Friedman

These teens from the Xhosa tribe wear traditional garb and paint after their coming-of-age circumcision ceremony near Qunu, South Africa. CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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CARL DE SOUZA/AFP/Getty Images

Eugene De Kock a former Vlakplaas commander speaks to the judge at a Truth and Reconciliation Commission in 1999. De Kock, the apartheid regime's top assassin, asked the commission for amnesty for over 100 incidents of torture, murder and fraud. Yoav Lemmer /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yoav Lemmer /AFP/Getty Images

Cover detail of The Girl from Human Street. Courtesy of Penguin Random House hide caption

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Courtesy of Penguin Random House

A Memoir Of A Family's Diaspora, And A Mother's Depression

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Oscar Pistorius is escorted by police officers as he leaves the high court in Pretoria, South Africa, on Oct. 17. A South African judge ruled today that prosecutors can appeal the culpable homicide verdict handed to the athlete for killing his girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp. Themba Hadebe/AP hide caption

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Themba Hadebe/AP

They're not just surfing for fun. Youngsters in Cape Town's Waves for Change are facing mental health problems. With the help of a surfing mentor and a counselor, they can learn how to cope. Anders Kelto/NPR hide caption

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Anders Kelto/NPR

If Everybody Had An Ocean, Could We Surf Our Way To Mental Health?

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