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Even after massively increasing production of the Model 3, Tesla still hasn't managed to offer the car at its touted price of $35,000. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Tesla's Challenge: Leaving Behind The Lap Of Luxury

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People at the Ford display at the Essen Motor Show fair in Essen, Germany, in December 2017. The automaker has announced it will be cutting some jobs in Europe to reduce costs. Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images

Don Skidmore stands in front of a sign for United Auto Workers Local 735, the union chapter he represented as president when he was a General Motors employee. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

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Ari Shapiro/NPR

Life After GM: A Family Upended By Auto Plant Closure Took Divergent Paths

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Kevin Scott, a South Dakota farmer and secretary of the American Soybean Association, welcomed the deal to replace NAFTA because it preserved the market access established under the previous agreement. Courtesy of Jannell Scott hide caption

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Courtesy of Jannell Scott

From The Front Lines Of NAFTA, More Relief Than Rejoicing

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Engineers track progress of construction at a Toyota plant in Kentucky in 1986. It was one of several factories built in the 1980s by Japanese automakers in the U.S. as a result of voluntary limits on Japanese auto exports. AP hide caption

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AP

Can A Reagan-Era Policy Offer An Alternative To Tariffs?

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Jeep Wranglers are displayed at a Manhattan Fiat Chrysler dealership. The automaker's latest quarterly earnings announcement comes at a time of deep uncertainty for the company. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Fiat Chrysler's New CEO Faces Twin Challenges: China And Tariffs

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New cars and cargo containers are shown in a staging area, on April 6, 2018, at the Port of Tacoma in Wash. On Wednesday, President Donald Trump ordered the Commerce secretary to look into whether tariffs are needed on vehicles and auto parts imported to the U.S. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Customers look at Tesla cars at a showroom in Hangzhou in China's eastern Zhejiang province on April 4. The cut in Chinese auto import tariffs could help Tesla, which has been looking to break into the Chinese market. -/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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-/AFP/Getty Images

Mary Buchzeiger, CEO of Lucerne International, says President Trump's proposed tariffs on imports could destroy her Michigan-based company, which supplies automakers with parts mostly made in China. This week, she presented her case for an exemption from the tariffs at the International Trade Commission building in Washington, D.C. John Ydstie/NPR hide caption

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John Ydstie/NPR

Small Business Owner Fears U.S.-China Trade War Will Destroy Her Company

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Ford F-150 pickup trucks are seen on Metro Ford's sales lot in Miami last October. The automaker had to temporarily halt production after a fire interrupted the supply of some parts. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Vehicles pass during the afternoon commute on Highway 101 in Los Angeles on April 2. California is suing the EPA over a plan to revise fuel efficiency standards for vehicles, weakening Obama-era limits on greenhouse gas emissions. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

A Cadillac salesmen talks with a potential customer at a shopping mall in Beijing in 2011. This week, China announced moves that could pave the way for new sales for some foreign automakers. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

3 Problems With Selling A Car In China

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A 2018 Ford Expedition goes through the assembly line at a Ford plant Oct. 27, in Louisville, Ky. Higher-profit SUVs and trucks are making up a larger share of auto sales, boosting the industry's fortunes. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

Auto Industry Healthy Enough To Withstand Next Downturn, Analysts Say

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Chevrolet Camaros are lined up at General Motors' Lansing Grand River Assembly Plant in Michigan in 2015. Automakers in the U.S. say if costs go up as a result of a renegotiated NAFTA, they would be less competitive. Rebecca Cook/Reuters hide caption

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Rebecca Cook/Reuters

Automakers Say Trump's Anti-NAFTA Push Could Upend Their Industry

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