auto industry auto industry

New cars and cargo containers are shown in a staging area, on April 6, 2018, at the Port of Tacoma in Wash. On Wednesday, President Donald Trump ordered the Commerce secretary to look into whether tariffs are needed on vehicles and auto parts imported to the U.S. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Customers look at Tesla cars at a showroom in Hangzhou in China's eastern Zhejiang province on April 4. The cut in Chinese auto import tariffs could help Tesla, which has been looking to break into the Chinese market. -/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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-/AFP/Getty Images

Mary Buchzeiger, CEO of Lucerne International, says President Trump's proposed tariffs on imports could destroy her Michigan-based company, which supplies automakers with parts mostly made in China. This week, she presented her case for an exemption from the tariffs at the International Trade Commission building in Washington, D.C. John Ydstie/NPR hide caption

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John Ydstie/NPR

Small Business Owner Fears U.S.-China Trade War Will Destroy Her Company

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Ford F-150 pickup trucks are seen on Metro Ford's sales lot in Miami last October. The automaker had to temporarily halt production after a fire interrupted the supply of some parts. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Vehicles pass during the afternoon commute on Highway 101 in Los Angeles on April 2. California is suing the EPA over a plan to revise fuel efficiency standards for vehicles, weakening Obama-era limits on greenhouse gas emissions. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

A Cadillac salesmen talks with a potential customer at a shopping mall in Beijing in 2011. This week, China announced moves that could pave the way for new sales for some foreign automakers. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

3 Problems With Selling A Car In China

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A 2018 Ford Expedition goes through the assembly line at a Ford plant Oct. 27, in Louisville, Ky. Higher-profit SUVs and trucks are making up a larger share of auto sales, boosting the industry's fortunes. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

Auto Industry Healthy Enough To Withstand Next Downturn, Analysts Say

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Chevrolet Camaros are lined up at General Motors' Lansing Grand River Assembly Plant in Michigan in 2015. Automakers in the U.S. say if costs go up as a result of a renegotiated NAFTA, they would be less competitive. Rebecca Cook/Reuters hide caption

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Rebecca Cook/Reuters

Automakers Say Trump's Anti-NAFTA Push Could Upend Their Industry

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Citi Bike users pedal through the streets of Manhattan. Some members of Generation Z, the younger generation following the millennials, are less inclined to own cars and lean more toward bike-sharing and ride-sharing services. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Generation Z May Not Want To Own Cars. Can Automakers Woo Them In Other Ways?

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The new Tesla Model 3 is displayed at the 2017 LA Auto Show. The company has struggled to meet its goal of producing thousands of the vehicles per week. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

Tesla Going At 'Warp Speed,' But Lags In Race To Produce Mass Market Electric Cars

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Charging station for electric cars in Glasgow, Scotland. With new models aimed at the mass market going on sale, Americans will be hearing a lot more about electric cars. John Guidi/Getty Images/Robert Harding Worl hide caption

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John Guidi/Getty Images/Robert Harding Worl

So You Want To Buy An Electric Car? It Requires Some Planning

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American troops use a Jeep in 1943 to clear land for Army camps in England. Fox Photos/Getty Images hide caption

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Fox Photos/Getty Images

Jeep: Why This American Icon Could Soon Be Part Of A Chinese Company

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Tesla Motors CEO Elon Musk speaks at the unveiling of the Model 3 in Hawthorne, Calif., on March 31, 2016. The first Model 3 is due to roll off the assembly line Friday. Justin Pritchard/AP hide caption

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Justin Pritchard/AP

As First Model 3 Rolls Off The Line, Can Tesla Sustain Momentum?

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Dodge head of passenger car brands Tim Kuniskis talks about the 2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Demon during a media preview for the New York International Auto Show on Tuesday. Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

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Julie Jacobson/AP

840 Horsepower And Revving To Go: A 'Last Gasp' For Supercars?

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