Medicare Medicare

Proposed changes to the tax law could eliminate the deduction for medical expenses. Those who use it generally have very high medical expenses, often for a disabled child, a serious chronic illness or expensive long-term care not covered by health insurance. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
PeopleImages/Getty Images

Alex Azar, who was deputy secretary for Health and Human Services in the George W. Bush administration, is President Trump's pick to replace Dr. Tom Price as head of the department. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Evan Vucci/AP

Trump Picks Alex Azar To Lead Health And Human Services

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/563735136/563894879" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Roughly 1.4 million people in the U.S. live in nursing homes, and two-thirds are covered by Medicaid, the state-federal health care program for people with low incomes or disabilities. Blend Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Blend Images/Getty Images

Some people seeking Medicare penalty waivers have experienced delays at their local Social Security Administration offices. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The new Medicare cards (right) will not use Social Security numbers for identification. Instead, they will have random sequences of letters and numbers. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services /AP hide caption

toggle caption
Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services /AP

We might all feel a lot better if we saw a view like this, from the North Shore of Oahu, every day. Vince Cavataio/Perspectives/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Vince Cavataio/Perspectives/Getty Images

Bill Moyers On Working With LBJ To Pass Medicare 52 Years Ago

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/541278161/541406453" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The HHS inspector general found that some 22,000 Medicare Part D beneficiaries seem to be doctor shopping for opioids — obtaining large amounts prescribed by four or more doctors and filled at four or more pharmacies. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Hugo, Colo., is home to no more than 850 residents, but has a beloved hospital where staff members know most of their patients by name. To survive financially, the hospital depends on payments from Medicaid, a program that faces deep cuts in the GOP health bill. Hart Van Denburg/CPR hide caption

toggle caption
Hart Van Denburg/CPR

A Hospital In Rural Colorado Is The Cornerstone Of Small Town Life

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/534555070/535131272" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Many people with marketplace health plans purchased under the Affordable Care Act didn't realize they need to switch to Medicare Part B plans at age 65. Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images/iStockphoto

Ben Gapinski, 10, (center) is greeted by his parents Dan and Nancy Gapinski after getting off the school bus. When Ben was a toddler, he was diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder and needed constant monitoring to stay safe. Sara Stathas for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Sara Stathas for NPR

Wisconsin Family Stays Together With Help From Medicaid

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/531572792/531629264" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Juanita Milton, who suffers from COPD, uses her nebulizer with albuterol sulfate at her home in Live Oak, Texas. Carolyn Van Houten for Kaiser Health News hide caption

toggle caption
Carolyn Van Houten for Kaiser Health News

Many COPD Patients Struggle To Pay For Each Breath

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/529759280/531269129" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A whistleblower lawsuit alleged that two Florida insurance plans inflated fees by making patients appear sicker than they were. Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images