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Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., at an Oakland, Calif., campaign rally this week. Harris says she backs a single-payer health system, but she hasn't yet offered details on how she would finance that plan. Mason Trinca/Getty Images hide caption

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Mason Trinca/Getty Images

Terry Mote (right) visits the home of Stanley and Lorit Jamor in Enid, Okla. Stanley was born on Bikini atoll, and is a descendant of Chief Juda, who was told in 1946 by Commodore Ben H. Wyatt, of the U.S. Navy, to give up the island homeland "for the good of all mankind." Bikini was a main site for U.S. nuclear testing and is uninhabitable to this day because of radioactive contamination. Sarah Craig for NPR hide caption

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Sarah Craig for NPR

A Policy Knot Leaves Oklahomans From Marshall Islands Struggling To Get Health Care

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Philadelphia demonstrators protested earlier moves by Republicans to repeal the Affordable Care Act last February. If the ACA is indeed axed as unconstitutional, health policy analysts say, millions of people could lose health coverage, and many aspects of Medicare and Medicaid would change dramatically. Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Medicare's new program will alter a year's worth of payments to 14,959 skilled nursing facilities across the U.S., based on how often in the past fiscal year their residents ended up back in hospitals within 30 days of leaving. BSIP/Getty Images hide caption

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BSIP/Getty Images

Shereese Hickson was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 2012 and is unable to work. She supports herself and her son, Isaiah, on $770 a month. Shane Wynn for KHN hide caption

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Shane Wynn for KHN

Chronically Ill, Traumatically Billed: $123,019 For 2 Multiple Sclerosis Treatments

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Services like rides to the doctor or wheelchair ramps are among those that some Medicare Advantage plans will begin to offer next year. Razvan Chisu / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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Razvan Chisu / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

"Democrats call it 'Medicare-for-all' because it sounds good, but in reality, it actually ends Medicare in its current form," Speaker of the House Paul Ryan asserted in a speech at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 8. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

President Trump attends a signing ceremony for health care measures in the Roosevelt Room of the White House on Wednesday, the same day USA Today published an opinion column on the topic by the president. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

FACT CHECK: Trump's False Claims On 'Medicare-For-All'

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Marilyn Bartlett spent two years running Montana's employee health plan. She made better deals with hospitals and drug benefits managers and saved the plan from bankruptcy. Mike Albans for NPR hide caption

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Mike Albans for NPR

A Tough Negotiator Proves Employers Can Bargain Down Health Care Prices

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Sutter Health Alta Bates Summit Medical Center, in Oakland, Calif. is one of hundreds of hospitals serving poor patients that will get some reprieve from Medicare's readmissions penalties. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

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Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

Michael Vigil, an oil contractor from Douglas, Wyo., traveled 250 miles to Denver to have his aortic valve replaced in May. He said he would have preferred his local hospital do the procedure. Courtesy of Michael Vigil hide caption

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Courtesy of Michael Vigil

Changes from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services could affect how some hospitals operate. David Sacks/Getty Images hide caption

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David Sacks/Getty Images

The results of genetic testing — whether done for health reasons or ancestry searches — can be used by insurance underwriters in evaluating an application for life insurance, or a disability or long-term-care policy. Science Photo Library RF/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Library RF/Getty Images

Good hospice care at the end of life can be a godsend to patients and their families, all agree, whether the care comes at home, or at an inpatient facility like this AIDS hospice. Still, oversight of the industry is important, federal investigators say. Bromberger Hoover Photography/Getty Images hide caption

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Bromberger Hoover Photography/Getty Images

HHS Inspector General's Report Finds Flaws And Fraud In U.S. Hospice Care

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Medicare's proposed changes to doctors' compensation will reduce paperwork, physicians agree. But at what cost to their income? andresr/Getty Images hide caption

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andresr/Getty Images

Some Doctors, Patients Balk At Medicare's 'Flat Fee' Payment Proposal

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