China China

Artist's rendition of a family of pterosaurs, which had massive wingspans of up to 13 feet and likely ate fish with their large teeth-filled jaws. Illustrated by Zhao Chuang hide caption

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Illustrated by Zhao Chuang

LeEco CEO Jia Yueting speaks in San Francisco in October 2016. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

For China's High-Flying Tycoons, A Precarious Balance

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PLA Gen. Zhang Yang, center, at a meeting of the National People's Congress in March 2013 in Beijing. Zhang, who was under investigation for corruption, took his own life last week, state media reported. Feng Li/Getty Images hide caption

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Feng Li/Getty Images

A woman reads a sign that says, "Due to a shortage of the raw material to make butter, we are not able to supply and sell you this product," attached to an empty refrigerated supermarket shelf in western France. Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images

Sacré Beurre: France Faces A Butter Shortage

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Fans cheer as Hong Kong's soccer team prepares to hit the field. Hong Kong fans have taken to booing China's national anthem in recent years to protest Beijing's tightening grip over the city. China's legislature has now made it illegal to disrespect the national anthem and the law will soon be enacted in Hong Kong. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

In Hong Kong, Booing China's National Anthem Is About To Get More Risky

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President Trump joined Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People on Nov. 9 in Beijing. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

In China, Trump Helped Basketball Stars But Not Human Rights

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In Chinese Cities, Migrants' Work Is Welcome. Their Children Are Not

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Flanked by teammates Cody Riley (left) and Jalen Hill, UCLA basketball player LiAngelo Ball reads his statement during a news conference at UCLA on Wednesday. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

A man rides a Mobike bicycle past the CCTV Headquarters building in Beijing. Mark Schiefelbein/AP for NPR hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP for NPR

The Startup That's Helping Bring Bikes Back To China's Streets

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This coal mine is in the town of Gujiao in Shanxi Province. Alyssa Edes/NPR hide caption

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Alyssa Edes/NPR

As China Moves To Other Energy Sources, Its Coal Region Struggles To Adapt

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China's President Xi Jinping speaks during a business leaders' event with President Trump in Beijing on Thursday. Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images

Chinese President Xi Jinping and his wife, Peng Liyuan, hosted President Trump and first lady Melania Trump during a tour of the Forbidden City in Beijing on Wednesday at the start of the third leg of Trump's Asian tour. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

China Lavishes Red-Carpet Treatment On Trump As He Arrives For Talks With Xi Jinping

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LiAngelo Ball is one of three UCLA basketball players who were detained in Hangzhou, China, reportedly over suspicions of shoplifting. Icon Sportswire/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images hide caption

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Icon Sportswire/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images

U.S. steak is sold among cuts of beef from Australia and New Zealand. Because the U.S. lacks a free trade agreement with China, its beef is expensive in China. As a result, it doesn't sell as well as beef from competing markets. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

Shaky U.S.-China Trade Relationship Will Top Trump's Agenda In Beijing

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A waitress serving shark fin soup in a restaurant in Guangzhou, in southern China's Guangdong province. Environmental and animal rights groups have campaigned for decades against consumption of shark fin, arguing that demand for the delicacy has decimated the world's shark population and that the methods used to obtain it are inhumane. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

A vehicle sits in an acoustics testing lab at BYD headquarters in Shenzhen. Qilai Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Qilai Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Chinese Electric Carmaker Aims To Become A Global Brand

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President Trump meets with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (right) and South Korean President Moon Jae-in before the Northeast Asia Security dinner at the U.S. Consulate General in Hamburg, Germany, on July 6. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

President Trump Is Going To Asia: What To Watch For At Each Stop

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