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Sheng Hong is director of the Beijing-based Unirule Institute of Economics. He's one of a growing number of critics within elite circles in China who are criticizing China's handling of the trade war. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

Amid Trade War With U.S., There Are Signs Of Dissent Among China's Economists

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President Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping participate in a welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing last November. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Beijing Is Pushing Hard To Influence U.S. Views Of China, Report Says

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President Trump talks with reporters before traveling to the Group of 20 Summit in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on the South Lawn of the White House on Thursday. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

President Trump Cancels Putin Meeting On Eve Of G-20

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American biologist David Baltimore criticized a fellow scientist who claims he has edited the genes human embryos during the Second International Summit on Human Genome Editing at the University of Hong Kong. China News Service/VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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China News Service/VCG via Getty Images

Science Summit Denounces Gene-Edited Babies Claim, But Rejects Moratorium

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Researcher He Jiankui spoke Wednesday during the 2nd International Summit on Human Genome Editing in Hong Kong. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

Facing Backlash, Chinese Scientist Defends Gene-Editing Research On Babies

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A security guard stands in front of Google's booth at the China International Import Expo earlier this month in Shanghai. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

'We're Taking A Stand': Google Workers Protest Plans For Censored Search In China

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Tianjin, in northern China, is home to Tianjin University, an international research center that recently hired an American to lead its school of pharmaceutical science and technology. He recruits students from all over the world, he says, and the program's classes are taught in English. Prisma Bildagentur/UIG/Getty Images hide caption

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Prisma Bildagentur/UIG/Getty Images

China Expands Research Funding, Luring U.S. Scientists And Students

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Rhino horns are prized in Asian countries and can garner tens of thousands of dollars per pound. Wildlife conservationists argue that the appetite for the endangered species' appendage in legal and illegal markets has decimated the population across Africa. Raymond Roig/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Raymond Roig/AFP/Getty Images

An ethnic Kazakh woman tried to cancel her Chinese citizenship after she married and moved to Kazakhstan. When she crossed back into China last year, the problems began. Nicole Xu for NPR hide caption

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Nicole Xu for NPR

'They Ordered Me To Get An Abortion': A Chinese Woman's Ordeal In Xinjiang

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A Pakistani ranger stands in front of a damaged gate at the Chinese consulate after an attack in Karachi on Friday. Asif Hassan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Asif Hassan/AFP/Getty Images

Militants, Police Killed In Failed Attack On Chinese Consulate In Karachi

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Chinese President Xi Jinping (left) shakes hands with Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte after a guest book signing at the MalacaƱang presidential palace in Manila on Tuesday. Duterte called Xi's visit to longtime U.S. ally the Philippines a "milestone." Mark R. Cristino/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark R. Cristino/AFP/Getty Images

Demonstrators hold banners in support of workers at the Jasic Technology factory in Shenzhen, in China's Guangdong province, on Aug. 6. Sue-Lin Wong/Reuters hide caption

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Sue-Lin Wong/Reuters

In China, The Communist Party's Latest, Unlikely Target: Young Marxists

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Mir, a Pakistani man who used to live in Xinjiang, China, clutches the hands of his two daughters. Since Chinese authorities detained his wife, he's been raising their two girls alone. "My mind just won't work," he says. "I sound incoherent, I can't think, I even forget what to say in my prayers." Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/NPR

'My Family Has Been Broken': Pakistanis Fear For Uighur Wives Held In China

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The circles on the map pinpoint the location of thousands of Chinese-funded development projects. The bigger the circle, the bigger the investment. The largest circles represent projects in the multibillion-dollar range. Map by Soren Patterson, AidData/William & Mary/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Map by Soren Patterson, AidData/William & Mary/Screenshot by NPR