China China

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff (from left), Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Russian President Vladimir Putin, Chinese President Xi Jinping and South African President Jacob Zuma pose for a photo during the BRICS Summit in Ufa, Russia, in July. RIA Novosti via AP hide caption

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RIA Novosti via AP

Highflying 'Emerging Markets' Had Their Wings Clipped In 2015

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Chinese dredging vessels are purportedly seen in the waters around a reef in the disputed Spratly Islands, in a still image from video taken by a U.S. Navy surveillance aircraft in May. China says a U.S. bomber got too close to one of the islands. Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Reuters/Landov

China's Cyberspace Administration minister Lu Wei (second from right) and other officials attend the opening ceremony of the Light of the Internet Expo on Tuesday as part of the Second World Internet Conference, which starts Wednesday. Lu has said that controlling the Internet is about as easy as "nailing Jell-O to the wall." Xu Yu/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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Xu Yu/Xinhua /Landov

China's Internet Forum May Provide A Peek At Its Cyber-Ambitions

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Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe, seen here delivering a speech during his 91st birthday celebration in February, is the latest Confucius Peace Prize winner. Like his predecessors, he has shunned the award. Jekesai Njikizana /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jekesai Njikizana /AFP/Getty Images

Young boys in Beijing check a smartphone in front of their home near a coal-fired power plant. As China's economy slowed in 2015, its industrial use of coal likely dropped, too, researchers say. That may be behind the slight drop in global CO2 emissions. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

Small, Surprising Dip In World's Carbon Emissions Traced To China

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Beijing's chronic high pollution has forced residents to adjust to living with the haze. China is the world's biggest greenhouse gas emitter, but until recently, the government treated air pollution and climate change as separate issues, saying climate change was a Western problem. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

China's Greenhouse Gases Don't Seem To Trouble Most Of Its Citizens

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The Beijing Environment Exchange, one of seven emissions trading pilot programs in China, may be part of a nationwide carbon market by as early as 2017. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

China Plans To Create A Nationwide Carbon Market By 2017

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The antibiotic resistant bacteria have been found in pigs, pork and people in China. This pig is from a farm on the outskirts of Beijing. Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images

E. Coli Bacteria Can Transfer Antibiotic Resistance To Other Bacteria

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China's President Xi Jinping speaks at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Summit in Manila, Philippines, on Wednesday. Xi condemned the killing of a Chinese citizen by ISIS, but did not specify any actions that China might take. SeongJoon Cho/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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SeongJoon Cho/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Chinese President Xi Jinping, right, and Taiwanese President Ma Ying-jeou, left, shake hands at the start of a historic meeting. The moment marks the first top-level contact between the formerly-bitter Cold War foes in 66 years. Wong Maye-E/AP hide caption

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Wong Maye-E/AP

Historic Handshake: China, Taiwan Leaders Meet For First Time In 66 Years

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