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The Chinese company Fuling Plastic set up a plant in Allentown, Pa., last year. The company, which makes straws and other plastic products, supplies fast food chains. Chinese companies are expected to invest about $30 billion in the U.S. this year, doubling the record set last year. Jackie Northam/NPR hide caption

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Jackie Northam/NPR

China Ramps Up U.S. Investments, From Straws To Semiconductors

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Chinese lesbian couple Rui Cai (left) and Cleo Wu play with their twin babies, born last month. China does not allow same-sex marriages, and only married, heterosexual couples have access to assisted reproduction. The women went through in vitro fertilization in the U.S., and the children were born in China. Courtesy of Rui Cai and Cleo Wu hide caption

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Courtesy of Rui Cai and Cleo Wu

Undaunted By China's Rule Book, Lesbian Couple Welcomes Their Newborn Twins

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A Chinese police officer poses with Chinese tourists in front of Milan's cathedral on May 3. Chinese police are on patrol with Italian officers to help make Chinese visitors feel safer. Antonio Calanni/AP hide caption

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Antonio Calanni/AP

Chinese Cops In Italy? Joint Patrols Aim To Ease Chinese Tourists' Jitters

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Trombonist and composer Reginald Cyntje was born in Dominica and raised in the U.S. Virgin Islands on a diet of reggae, calypso, classical and jazz. Patrick Jarenwattananon/NPR hide caption

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Patrick Jarenwattananon/NPR

Baidu, China's largest search engine, is under investigation after a college student with a rare form of cancer said it promoted a fraudulent treatment. Alexander F. Yuan/AP hide caption

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Alexander F. Yuan/AP

China Investigates Search Engine Baidu After Student Dies Of Cancer

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A worker leaves the Baosteel Group Corporation plant in Shanghai in March 2016. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

Starbucks And Steel: The Divergent Directions Of China's Economy

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A steel mill in Tangshan, in China's Hebei province. U.S. Steel claims that the Chinese government dumps steel at unfair prices and uses computer hackers to steal intellectual property. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

Chinese officials answer questions about a new law regulating overseas nongovernmental organizations during a press conference at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Thursday. The new law subjects NGOs to close police supervision. "We welcome and support all foreign NGOs to come to China to conduct friendly exchanges," one official said. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Ng Han Guan/AP

China Passes Law Putting Foreign NGOs Under Stricter Police Control

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Investors in Zhongjin, a wealth-management company that collapsed this month, demonstrate outside a police office in Shanghai's Hongkou district, demanding repayment of their funds. Police later detained one of the demonstrators for distributing protest T-shirts. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Frank Langfitt/NPR

Chinese Investors Reeling After Wealth Management Firm's Collapse

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