China China

The Japanese supercomputer K, pictured in June 2012 at the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science in Kobe, western Japan. The K computer is currently ranked No. 3 on a list of the 500 fastest supercomputers. Kyodo/Landov hide caption

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Kyodo/Landov

A Chinese worker is seen at a construction site in Beijing. Economic changes in China and in other places have reduced demand and prices for commodities like the metal in the building's structure. AP hide caption

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AP

A group of Uighur protesters demonstrate outside the Thai embassy in Ankara, Turkey, on Thursday to protest Thailand's deportation of 100 Uighur refugees back to China. Burhan Ozbilici/AP hide caption

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Burhan Ozbilici/AP

Adm. Michael Rogers, NSA director and head of the U.S. Cyber Command, has avoided singling out China for blame in the OPM hack, which may affect as many as 18 million federal workers. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

In Data Breach, Reluctance To Point The Finger At China

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People walk on the Bund, the riverfront area next to the financial district in Shanghai. Many foreigners have descended on Shanghai to make money on China's economic expansion. NPR's Frank Langfitt met one such woman as part of the free taxi rides he's been offering. Aly Song/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Aly Song/Reuters/Landov

Single Mom Leads Double Life On The Streets Of Shanghai

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NPR's Frank Langfitt has been offering free taxi rides around Shanghai to talk to ordinary Chinese. He drives a Camry around the city, but rented a van for a trip 500 miles outside the city earlier this year. He recently decided to buy a car, which can be a complicated process in China. Yang Zhuo for NPR hide caption

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Yang Zhuo for NPR

Would You Buy A Used Car From A Man Named Beer Horse?

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Zhou Qiang, president of the Supreme People's Court of China, speaks to the National People's Congress in Beijing on March 12. Chinese authorities are waging a major campaign against corruption, and that includes a list of 100 suspects believed to be overseas. Many are former officials who are thought to have fled to the U.S. or Canada. Lintao Zhang/Getty Images hide caption

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Lintao Zhang/Getty Images

When Corrupt Chinese Officials Flee, The U.S. Is A Top Destination

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Sun Jianguo (left), from the Chinese People's Liberation Army Navy, chats with U.S. Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter in May during the ministerial luncheon at the 14th Asia Security Summit in Singapore. Each country has grown increasingly wary of the other's actions and interests in the South China Sea. Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images

China's Island-Building Has Neighbors On Edge, But Tensions May Be Easing

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