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Two Chinese divers from the People's Liberation Army Navy are suited up and prepared to observe U.S. Navy divers in an underwater welding exercise. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

Rising Tensions? Yes, But The U.S. And Chinese Navies Are Training Together

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An exhibitor shows a smart rice cooker to a visitor at a display booth for MiJia, a new brand by Xiaomi at the 2016 Global Mobile Internet Conference in Beijing on April 28. Andy Wong/AP hide caption

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Andy Wong/AP

Losing Steam In Smartphones, Chinese Firm Turns To Smart Rice Cookers

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China's Fu Yuanhui (left) celebrates her bronze medal win in the women's 100-meter backstroke with Canada's Kylie Masse, Hungary's Katinka Hosszu and the U.S.'s Kathleen Baker. Christophe Simon/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Christophe Simon/AFP/Getty Images

China Celebrates Bronze-Winning Olympic Swimmer's Spirit

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Xiaoxing Xi, a Temple University physics professor, speaks in front of a photo of Sherry Chen, a federal government worker, at a September 2015 Washington, D.C., press conference about the spying charges against them that were dropped. Xi says his wife and daughters were marched out of their bedrooms at gunpoint when he was arrested in May 2015. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

The Fine Line Between Countering Security Threats And Racial Profiling

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Du Daozheng browses his copy of The Annals of the Chinese Nation, or Yanhuang Chunqiu, in July at his home in Beijing. The 93-year old publisher, a stalwart of the Communist Party's embattled liberal wing, announced publication of the magazine would end after government officials ordered a leadership reshuffle and seized its offices. Gerry Shih/AP hide caption

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Gerry Shih/AP

Amid Crackdown, China's Last Liberal Magazine Fights For Survival

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Students perform a creative writing exercise at Cold Water Well Middle School. Students write descriptive prose from the perspective of a human statue, a blind person feeling the statue, and an outside observer. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

In China, Some Schools Are Playing With More Creativity, Less Cramming

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An Uber Station is shown outside a hotel in Chengdu, in southwest China's Sichuan province. Uber spent $1 billion in China last year, but only got a share of around 10 percent, compared to Didi Chuxing's more than 80 percent. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images

In China, A Battle Uber Didn't Win

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The Chinese government-selected Panchen Lama, Gyaincain Norbu (right), took part in the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference in Beijing on March 14. Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Greg Baker/AFP/Getty Images

In this file photo, Philippine navy personnel and congressmen land at a rock that is part of Scarborough Shoal bearing the Philippine flag that was earlier planted by Filipino fishermen. Jess Yuson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jess Yuson/AFP/Getty Images

In South China Sea Dispute, Filipinos Say U.S. Credibility Is On The Line

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Chinese Vice Foreign Minister Liu Zhenmin speaks during a conference at the State Council Information Office on Wednesday in Beijing. VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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VCG via Getty Images

A U.S. Marine amphibious assault vehicle makes its way to shore after leaving an amphibious transport dock ship during a landing exercise on a beach at San Antonio in the Philippines' Zambales Province on April 21, 2015. The exercise was part of annual Philippine-U.S. joint maneuvers and took place some 137 miles east of the Scarborough Shoal in the South China Sea. Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images

Will Hague Tribunal's South China Sea Ruling Inflame U.S.-China Tensions?

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