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Riot police fire tear gas at protesters in Hong Kong on Aug. 25. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

Police Bear Brunt Of Public Anger As Hong Kong Refuses To Accept Protesters' Demands

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Designer Isaac Mizrahi (left) embraces Robert D'Loren, CEO of Xcel Brands, which once manufactured 70% of its clothes in China. Today that's down to about 20%. The company now manufacturers in a variety of countries, including Indonesia, India and Sri Lanka. Brendan McDermid/Reuters hide caption

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Brendan McDermid/Reuters

China Falls Out Of Fashion For Some U.S. Brands

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Owned by Tencent, one of China's biggest companies, the WeChat app has more than 1 billion monthly users in China and now serves users outside the country, too. Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images

Armored personnel carriers of China's People's Liberation Army pass through the Huanggang Port border between China and Hong Kong early Thursday. Yuan Junmin/Xinhua/AP hide caption

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Yuan Junmin/Xinhua/AP

The USS Green Bay anchored just outside Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea, last year. Earlier this month, China refused to allow the Green Bay a port call at Hong Kong. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Visitors look at a Cadillac Escalade at the China Auto Show in Beijing in 2018. For General Motors, China is a bigger market than the United States. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

U.S. Companies In China Get Caught In The Trade War Crossfire

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The Australian government said on Tuesday that it was "very concerned and disappointed" that Yang Hengjun, shown with wife Yuan Xiaoliang, had been formally arrested in China on suspicion of espionage. Chongyi Feng via AP hide caption

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Chongyi Feng via AP

U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer (center left) shakes hands with Chinese Vice Premier Liu He at a conference center in Shanghai on July 31. Trade talks are expected to resume in September. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Ng Han Guan/AP

China's Leaders Are Divided Over Trade War With U.S.

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Police pull out their guns after a confrontation with demonstrators during a protest in Hong Kong on Sunday. One officer fired a warning shot in the air — the first such incident in 11 weeks of protests. Vincent Yu/AP hide caption

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Vincent Yu/AP

French President Emmanuel Macron (left) and President Trump participate in a G-7 working session. Trump is in Biarritz, France, for the G-7 summit of the world's biggest economic powers. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

President Trump announced higher U.S. tariffs on goods from China. "Our great American companies are hereby ordered to immediately start looking for an alternative to China," he tweeted. It was unclear what Trump could do to force U.S. firms to make such a move. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

An illustration of the video-sharing website Youtube logo and an Android mobile device with People's Republic of China flag in the background. SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Li Ka-shing speaks at a news conference in Hong Kong last year. The nonagenarian tycoon purchased full-page ads in local newspapers warning against violence — but at least one scholar of Chinese language sees a secret message of support for the protesters. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP