China China

A South China Morning Post advertisement at a Hong Kong subway station. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

A Storied Hong Kong Newspaper Feels The Heat From China

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Beijing-based restaurateur Song Ji (right) demonstrates his system, which allows customers to tip waitstaff. Diners use smartphones to scan QR codes that the waitstaff wear on their sleeves. This generates a tip of 4.56 yuan, or about 70 cents. Waitress Liu Enhui (left), the top tip-getter at the restaurant, says she can earn up to $30 a day in tips. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Long Absent In China, Tipping Makes A Comeback At A Few Trendy Restaurants

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Ethnic Yi schoolgirls take a break halfway down the mountain, on their way from their homes in Atule'er village to their first day of school in a new semester. The difficulty of getting up and down the mountain has made it hard for villagers to shake off poverty, and made it challenging for their children to attend school. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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A Harrowing, Mountain-Scaling Commute For Chinese Schoolkids

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A photo from November 2013 shows a man playing with his child at a park in Yichang, in central China's Hubei province. City leaders are encouraging couples to have two children. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Visitors stand beside a model of the Tiangong-1 space lab in 2010, at the 8th China International Aviation and Aerospace Exhibition in Zhuhai, China. The real Tiangong-1 was launched into space in 2011 and will be returning to Earth next year — with some observers speculating China has lost control over the spacecraft. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (left) and China's Premier Li Keqiang wrap up a joint press conference in Beijing on Aug. 31. Canada and China have agreed to discuss the possibility of an extradition treaty. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Jeffrey Wood has been studying at the Hopkins-Nanjing Center for Chinese and American Studies. He is now preparing for a career as a diplomat. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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For U.S. Minority Students In China, The Welcome Comes With Scrutiny

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Kim Chol Ho, deputy manager of the Rajin port, in North Korea's Rason Special Economic Zone, looks out at small fishing boats. Despite stepped-up international sanctions, North Korea is still trading extensively with China. Eric Talmadge/AP hide caption

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Eric Talmadge/AP

The 'Livelihood Loophole' And Other Weaknesses Of N. Korea Sanctions

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Skyscrapers in the mainland China city of Xiamen are seen in the distance from a beach on Taiwan's Kinmen Island. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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On A Rural Taiwanese Island, Modern China Beckons

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A Chinese flag flies on a boat next to the bridge that spans the Yalu River linking the North Korean town of Sinuiju with the Chinese town of Dandong. Most of North Korea's trade is with China, and much of it crosses the border here. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images