invasive species invasive species
Stories About

invasive species

Brazilian peppertree, Schinus terebinthifolia, is a relative of poison ivy. It is one of the most damaging invasive weeds of agricultural and natural areas of Florida, Hawaii and Texas. Courtesy of UF/IFAS hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of UF/IFAS

Florida Researchers Use Pests To Help Control Pesky Brazilian Peppertree Plant

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/774415087/776173377" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An adult spotted lanternfly searches for tasty grapevines at Vynecrest Vineyards and Winery, near Allentown, Pa. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Dan Charles/NPR

Vineyards Facing An Insect Invasion May Turn To Aliens For Help

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/760147903/761329168" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The sea squirt Ascidia sydneiensis, a tubelike animal that squirts water out of its body when alarmed, is one of 48 additional nonnative marine species in the Galapagos Islands documented in a newly published study. Previously, researchers knew of only five. Courtesy of Jim Carlton hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Jim Carlton

Dozens Of Nonnative Marine Species Have Invaded The Galapagos Islands

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/707626440/707722638" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Louisiana crawfish caught in waters in and around Berlin are on display at Fisch Frank fish restaurant in Berlin. They are an invasive species and authorities recently licensed a local fisherman to catch them and sell them to local restaurants. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Carsten Koall/Getty Images

For Berlin, Invasive Crustaceans Are A Tough Catch And A Tough Sell

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/636504971/636603650" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nutria were believed to have been eradicated in California, but the swamp rodent is back. Wildlife officials want the public's feedback before devising a new plan to get rid of them. Michael Probst/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Probst/AP

In trying to get people to eat the Pez Diablo, or suckermouth catfish, sustainable fisheries specialist Mike Mitchell says it isn't "a problem of biology or science, but marketing." DeAgostini/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
DeAgostini/Getty Images

This wild hog from Hawaii was raised at the National Wildlife Research Center in Fort Collins, Colo. Feral pigs in the wild tend to eat anything containing a calorie — from rows of corn to sea turtle eggs, to baby deer and goats. Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Rae Ellen Bichell/NPR

Scientists Get Down And Dirty With DNA To Track Wild Pigs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/507475723/513857968" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Biologist Shaun Clements counts down the seconds before emptying a vial of synthetic DNA into a stream near Alsea, Oregon. Jes Burns/Oregon Public Broadcasting/EarthFix hide caption

toggle caption
Jes Burns/Oregon Public Broadcasting/EarthFix

Old World climbing fern on a tree island in the Everglades surrounds LeRoy Rodgers of the South Florida Water Management District. Environmentalists say it's one of the worst invasive species the state has faced in a long time. Amy Green/WMFE hide caption

toggle caption
Amy Green/WMFE

Invasive Fern In Florida Threatens To Take Down More Than Just Trees

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/511218451/511267272" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A man carries a Nile Perch of about 175 pounds caught in a lake in Uganda. The huge fish — they can weigh up to 440 pounds — were introduced to several African lakes and have wiped out hundreds of local species. WALTER ASTRADA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
WALTER ASTRADA/AFP/Getty Images

At Ulva Island Bird Sanctuary on Stewart Island, New Zealand, a sign warned visitors in 2008 to check their bags. The fight against invasive predators continues. Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images

Feral hogs in Great Smoky Mountains National Park are an invasive and hugely destructive species. Courtesy of Bill Lea hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Bill Lea

On The Trail Of The Wily Wild Hog

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/479584561/479613783" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Fish and Wildlife Commissioner Ron Bergeron handles a snake as part of the Python Challenge in the Everglades. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Greg Allen/NPR

Hunting Snakes In The Everglades To Protect Native Species

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/463343169/463371584" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript