wine wine

Making ice wine requires the grape to be picked and pressed at below-freezing temperatures, like in this vineyard in southern Germany. So, only a few places in the world — mainly Canada and Germany — produce it. But now, vineyards in frigid parts of the U.S., are making their own ice wine, giving Americans a chance to buy domestically produced bottles. Patrick Seeger/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Seeger/AFP/Getty Images

New York Vineyard Takes A Risk On Ice Wine For A Sweet Reward

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Smoke from wildfires, like this lingering cloud in Sonoma County, Calif., in October, may be responsible for creating an off taste in wine. George Rose/Getty Images hide caption

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George Rose/Getty Images

Grapes have been growing along the steep slopes of Germany's Mosel River for centuries. Now global warming is shifting the timing of the harvest. Daniella Cheslow for NPR hide caption

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Daniella Cheslow for NPR

Climate Change Ripens Prospects For German Winemakers

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At the Cathedral Ridge Winery in Hood River, Ore., smoke has poured into the property and there are worries it could alter the taste of the grapes. Molly Solomon/OPB hide caption

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Molly Solomon/OPB

Proponents of the emerging pot-for-pleasure industry want to grab a share of the nearly $2 billion tourism business in Sonoma County with events like dinners that incorporate marijuana. Courtesy of Sonoma Cannabis Company/Kristen Jeanne hide caption

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Courtesy of Sonoma Cannabis Company/Kristen Jeanne

Pairing Wine And Weed: Is It A California Dream Or Nightmare?

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A visitor to the Robert Mondavi Winery in Napa Valley, Calif., attends a wine tasting class. Unlike food — which gives us sensory cues like crunchy and hot, as well as tasting, say, salty — with wine, it's all about tiny differences in taste and smell. The danger is in getting too poetic. Charles O'Rear/Getty Images hide caption

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Charles O'Rear/Getty Images

Molecules in wine stimulate thousands of taste and odor receptors, sending a flavor signal to the brain that triggers massive cognitive computation involving pattern recognition, memory, value judgment, emotion and, of course, pleasure. Alex Reynolds/NPR hide caption

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Alex Reynolds/NPR

The John C. Sullenger Vineyard at Nickel & Nickel Winery, Napa Valley, Calif. Nickel & Nickel collaborated with scientists to collect wine samples and identify the bacteria and fungi in them by sequencing microbial DNA. Jason Tinacci/Courtesy of Nickel & Nickel hide caption

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Jason Tinacci/Courtesy of Nickel & Nickel