interest rates interest rates

President Trump looks on as his nominee for Federal Reserve chairman, Jerome Powell, speaks at the White House on Nov. 2. On Thursday, Trump said he is "not thrilled" about Fed interest rate hikes. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Trump Slams Interest Rate Hikes, Ignoring Hands-Off Tradition Toward Fed

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Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell speaks before the Economic Club of Chicago on April 6. The central bank raised a key short-term rate by a quarter-point on Wednesday, the second increase this year. Charles Rex Arbogast/AP hide caption

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Charles Rex Arbogast/AP

Trader Edward Curran (right) works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Monday. As Treasury yields topped 3 percent on Tuesday, the Dow Jones industrial average tumbled. Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

Federal Reserve Board Chairman Jerome Powell testifies during a Senate banking committee hearing in Washington, D.C., on March 1. This week, Powell presided over a Fed policy meeting for the first time since becoming chairman. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Fed Raises Interest Rates Again As New Chairman Steps Into Spotlight

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Traders at the New York Stock Exchange on Friday. The Dow Jones industrial average fell 666 points amid signs that interest rates are heading higher. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Dow Drops 666 Points In Sharp Sell-Off

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Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen, who will step down in February, has said she thinks the forces that have been holding inflation down are temporary and that she expects it will soon be on the rise again. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Fed Raises Interest Rates Again As Economy Rolls On

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President Trump hasn't said whether he will reappoint Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen to a second term. He is expected to announce his decision Thursday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen is expected to discuss the central bank's decision on a benchmark interest rate Wednesday. She's seen here speaking on Capitol Hill last month. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Federal Reserve Raises Key Interest Rate In First Move Since 2015

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Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen speaks during a House Financial Services Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 28. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Natalia Mendez goes over mortgage terms with Raul Alvarez, a senior loan officer for Paramount Residential Mortgage Group, Dec. 16 in Miami. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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With Rates Down, It's Time For Many To Refinance Again. Thanks, Brexit

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Federal Reserve policymakers left rates unchanged, saying they were worried about job growth and did not want higher rates to affect hiring. Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images

British Prime Minister David Cameron delivers a speech on the upcoming EU referendum in London on June 7. Concerns about a possible "Brexit" from the EU have rattled financial markets. WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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WPA Pool/Getty Images

Bonds Pay Less Than Zero As Investors Flee To Safety

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Toyota cars for sale are parked at a dealership in Danvers, Mass. Federal Reserve policymakers left rates unchanged Wednesday, which should keep down the costs of car loans and other borrowing. Elise Amendola/AP hide caption

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Elise Amendola/AP

An employee prepares to install the hood on a vehicle at a General Motors plant in Arlington, Texas. Federal Reserve policymakers say recent indicators point to a strengthening labor market. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Federal Reserve Bank Chair Janet Yellen holds a news conference after the central bank announced its first rate increase in more than 9 years. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

De Desharnais, a homebuilder and real estate agent in Nashua, N.H., stands in front of a house her company is constructing. She says her company had 32 employees at the height of the housing boom, and now only has six despite the industry's gradual recovery. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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Chris Arnold/NPR

Will A Fed Interest Rate Hike Slow The Housing Recovery?

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