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The sweetened beverage industry has spent millions to combat soda taxes and support medical groups that avoid blaming sugary drinks for health problems. Melissa Lomax Speelman/Getty Images hide caption

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Melissa Lomax Speelman/Getty Images

The IRS has extended the filing deadline because of technical problems. Taxpayers now have until midnight Wednesday to file their returns or extension requests and pay their taxes. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

The IRS estimates that more than $65 million has been lost to phone tax scammers in the last five years. They're most active during high tax season in March and April. mihailomilovanovic/Getty Images hide caption

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mihailomilovanovic/Getty Images

As Tax Day Approaches, Watch Out For Phone Scammers

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Carl Pasciuto, president of the Custom Group, says he needs well-trained workers more than he needs equipment. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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Chris Arnold/NPR

Tax Bill Favors Adding Robots Over Workers, Critics Say

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House Speaker Paul Ryan at the U.S. Capitol yesterday. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

FACT CHECK: How Does Paul Ryan's Case For Tax Cuts Match The Facts?

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For craft breweries, the Senate's tax code overhaul could be very good for business. The plan includes a provision that would save alcohol producers $4.2 billion from 2018 to 2019. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Harvard graduate student Jack Nicoludis (right), who helped organize a campus protest on Wednesday, says the House tax bill would more than double his taxes. "This plan is going to be disastrous for higher ed," he says. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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Chris Arnold/NPR

University Graduate Students Walk Out To Protest Tax Plan That Hurts Them

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Education Secretary Betsy DeVos (right) toured public schools in Puerto Rico this week with Puerto Rico Secretary of Education Dr. Julia Keleher (left) and Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló (second from left). Courtesy of the Puerto Rico Department of Eduaction hide caption

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Courtesy of the Puerto Rico Department of Eduaction

House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., announces the outlines of a GOP overhaul of the tax code in September. The full bill's release is being delayed to Thursday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

People hoping to get health insurance coverage in 2018 may need to make sure their 2017 premiums are paid. Busakorn Pongparnit/Getty Images hide caption

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Busakorn Pongparnit/Getty Images

In 2012, Republican Gov. Sam Brownback of Kansas pushed reforms through the Legislature that included across-the-board income tax reductions. But rather than boosting the economy, the cuts caused revenues to plummet. Lawmakers now seek to close a $900 million budget gap over the next two years. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

The Chrysler Building is reflected in the side of the Grand Hyatt Hotel in midtown Manhattan. The hotel on East 42nd Street was Donald Trump's first major development project. Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images

As Trump Built His Real Estate Empire, Tax Breaks Played A Pivotal Role

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