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Hong Kong in 2012. The territory's public-service broadcaster will replace the BBC with the China National News, broadcast in Mandarin, China's official language, instead of the Cantonese dialect more commonly spoken in Hong Kong. Vincent Yu/AP hide caption

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Vincent Yu/AP

David Tang, the creator of the Shanghai Tang clothing and accessories chain, sits in his Hong Kong office in 2004. Tang has died at the age of 63. Samantha Sin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Samantha Sin/AFP/Getty Images

People stand in front of eggs displayed at a supermarket in Lille, France, on Friday as a scandal over contaminated eggs spreads across Europe. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Chinese President Xi Jinping, right, and Hong Kong's new Chief Executive Carrie Lam leave after administering the oath for a five-year term in office at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Center in Hong Kong Saturday, July 1, 2017. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

Pro-democracy activists hang a black cloth with a message demanding universal suffrage and the release of jailed Chinese Nobel Peace laureate Liu Xiaobo on the Golden Bauhinia flower statue in Hong Kong. On Monday, they had obscured the statue — a gift from Beijing to Hong Kong — with black cloth. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

Weiqi Zhu, an equity derivatives trader in Hong Kong, is one of an increasing number of financial sector employees from mainland China who are dominating the city's banking sector. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

How Hong Kong's Banks Turned Chinese

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Over the years, Beijing has tightened its political grip over Hong Kong, a city of more than 7 million people, and income inequality has risen. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

20 Years After Handover, Hong Kong Residents Reflect On Life Under Chinese Rule

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Activists Chu Yiu-ming, left, and Chan Kin-man gesture to supporters as they report to be arrested at a police station in Hong Kong. Police say the men and other Umbrella Movement activists will be charged over mass protests that took place in 2014. Jayne Russell/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jayne Russell/AFP/Getty Images

Carrie Lam, a candidate for Hong Kong's chief executive, greets supporters on Thursday. She is considered Beijing's preferred candidate and is widely expected to win Sunday's vote. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

In Race For New Leader, Many In Hong Kong See 'Selection,' Not Election

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Sixtus "Baggio" Leung (left) and Yau Wai-ching (right) of the Youngspirations party march during a protest in Hong Kong on Sunday. Hong Kong police used pepper spray to drive back hundreds of protesters angry at China's decision to intervene in a row over whether the two pro-independence lawmakers should be barred from the city's legislature. Isaac Lawrence/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Isaac Lawrence/AFP/Getty Images

Claudia Mo, a Hong Kong legislator, expects a new group of young lawmakers in Hong Kong to push back against mainland China. "I think Hong Kong will become even more vibrant on the political front," she says. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

Hong Kong Wrestles With An Identity Crisis

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Angela Gui packs for a trip to Geneva for human rights training at the United Nations. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Frank Langfitt/NPR

For Daughter Of Missing Hong Kong Bookseller, Activism Is Not A Choice

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Nathan Law, 23, is a former leader of Hong Kong's 2014 Umbrella Movement protests against China. Now he is the city's youngest legislator ever, and says he will support additional protests against the mainland. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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At 23, Hong Kong Lawmaker Promises Feisty Protests Aimed At China

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