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SoFi, the robotic fish, swims in for its close-up. MIT computer scientists hope SoFi will help marine biologists get a closer (and less obtrusive) look at their subjects than ever before. Robert Katzschmann et al. (Photo: Joseph DelPreto)/MIT CSAIL hide caption

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Robert Katzschmann et al. (Photo: Joseph DelPreto)/MIT CSAIL
Jenn Liv for NPR

Sometimes We Feel More Comfortable Talking To A Robot

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A robot sweeps the floor at the main press center at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics. Steve Russell/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Russell/Toronto Star via Getty Images

Carl Pasciuto, president of the Custom Group, says he needs well-trained workers more than he needs equipment. Chris Arnold/NPR hide caption

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Chris Arnold/NPR

Tax Bill Favors Adding Robots Over Workers, Critics Say

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Matt Oehrlein and Gui Cavalcanti, co-founders of the robotics company, MegaBots, with giant robots MK2 (left) and Eagle Prime. Greg Munson hide caption

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Greg Munson

No Rock 'Em Sock 'Em Here: Behold A U.S. Vs. Japan Giant Robot Duel

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Ryan Mac/Twitter/Screenshot by NPR

When Robot Face-Plants In Fountain, Onlookers Show Humanity — By Gloating

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Starship Technologies' delivery robots, which can be found traveling the sidewalks of Washington, D.C., get smarter the more they drive — learning about sidewalk and traffic patterns with every trip they take. Meg Kelly/NPR hide caption

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Meg Kelly/NPR

Hungry? Call Your Neighborhood Delivery Robot

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As the presence of artificial intelligence continues to grow in the world, industry leaders and scholars are starting to explore the ethics surrounding the science. Juan Mabromata/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Juan Mabromata/AFP/Getty Images

Scholars Delve Deeper Into The Ethics Of Artificial Intelligence

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Mobile ovens inside the delivery truck cook the pie right before it reaches its destination. Zume Pizza hide caption

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Zume Pizza

Our Robot Overlords Are Now Delivering Pizza, And Cooking It On The Go

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Customers use interactive kiosks to place orders at Eatsa, a fully automated fast food restaurant in San Francisco. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

As Our Jobs Are Automated, Some Say We'll Need A Guaranteed Basic Income

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When a person places a finger in the slot on the left, the robot uses an algorithm — unpredictable even to its creator — to decide whether to prick the finger with the pin on the end of its arm. Alexander Reben hide caption

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Alexander Reben

A Robot That Harms: When Machines Make Life Or Death Decisions

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W. H. Richards and A.H. Reffell built Eric in 1928. The Science Museum estimates it will take expert roboticist Giles Walker three months to reconstruct him. Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images hide caption

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Gamma-Keystone via Getty Images

London Museum Hopes To Reboot Eric, Britain's First Robot

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