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Created by Chinese programmers, 996.ICU has become a popular repository of workers' rights campaign materials on the website GitHub. The name is a play on a refrain that long work hours of 9 to 9, six days a week, could send tech workers to the intensive care unit. 996.ICU/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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996.ICU/Screenshot by NPR

GitHub Has Become A Haven For China's Censored Internet Users

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Raman Ghuman demonstrates a HoloLens device at Microsoft's annual conference for software developers on May 7, 2018, in Seattle. Microsoft workers are protesting the use of the augmented reality technology in a U.S. Army contract. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Gizmodo's Kashmir Hill tried to disconnect from all Amazon products, including smart speakers, as part of a bigger experiment in living without the major tech players. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Why We Can't Break Up With Big Tech

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This is a visualization of global Internet attacks, seen during the 4th China Internet Security Conference in Beijing. Microsoft's Bing search engine is no longer accessible in China, the company reports. Ng Han Guan/AP hide caption

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Ng Han Guan/AP

Brad Smith, president of Microsoft Corp., speaks during a presentation on affordable housing in Bellevue, Wash., on Thursday. Microsoft Corp. said it will spend $500 million to develop affordable housing and help alleviate homelessness in the Seattle area. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

"We have only begun to scratch the surface of the complex problems inherent in figuring out ... the brain's inner workings," said Paul Allen in 2012. Kum Kulish/Corbis/Getty Images hide caption

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Kum Kulish/Corbis/Getty Images

An unidentified man walks in front of the Microsoft logo at an event in New Delhi. Microsoft is at the center of a Supreme Court case on whether it has to turn over emails stored overseas. Altaf Qadri/AP hide caption

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Altaf Qadri/AP

Court Seems Unconvinced Of Microsoft's Argument To Shield Email Data Stored Overseas

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In his new book, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella explores how he's had to work on his capacity for empathy to change the company's culture. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

How Do You Turn Around A Tech Giant? With Empathy, Microsoft CEO Says

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Brad Smith speaks at the Microsoft Annual Shareholders meeting in 2015. The Microsoft president issued sharp words Tuesday against President Trump's decision to cancel DACA in six months and called on Congress to make immigration a top priority. Stephen Brashear/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Brashear/Getty Images

Microsoft President To Trump: To Deport A DREAMer, You'll Have To Go Through Us

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Employees at a store in Kiev, Ukraine, read a ransomware demand for $300 in bitcoin to free files encrypted by the Petya software virus. The malicious program has spread to dozens of countries. Vincent Mundy/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Vincent Mundy/Bloomberg via Getty Images

'Petya' Ransomware Hits At Least 65 Countries; Microsoft Traces It To Tax Software

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Microsoft President Brad Smith speaks at the annual Microsoft shareholders meeting on Nov. 30, 2016, in Bellevue, Wash. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Microsoft President Urges Nuclear-Like Limits On Cyberweapons

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After the WannaCry cyberattack hit computer systems worldwide, Microsoft says governments should report software vulnerabilities instead of collecting them. Here, a ransom window announces the encryption of data on a transit display in eastern Germany on Friday. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/AFP/Getty Images