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'Never Seen Morale This Low': Correctional Officers Struggle Through Shutdown

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The Farmington Mine Disaster memorial in Mannington, W.Va., bears the names of the 78 men killed in the explosion on Nov. 20, 1968. Jesse Wright/West Virginia Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Jesse Wright/West Virginia Public Broadcasting

How A 1968 Disaster In A Coal Mine Changed The Industry

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Paramedic Larrecsa Cox (center) and her quick-response team, including police Officer Stephanie Coffey (left) and Pastor Virgil Johnson (right), check in at the home in Huntington, W.Va., of someone who was revived a few days before from an overdose. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

Knocking On Doors To Get Opioid Overdose Survivors Into Treatment

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West Virginia House Speaker Pro Tempore John Overington presides over a hearing on articles of impeachment on Monday at the state Capitol in Charleston, W.Va. John Raby/AP hide caption

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John Raby/AP

West Virginia House Votes To Impeach All 4 State Supreme Court Justices

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More than 2,100 drug felons were denied SNAP benefits in West Virginia in 2016. The number has more than tripled during the past decade. Patrick Strattner/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Strattner/Getty Images

Former Massey CEO and West Virginia Republican senatorial candidate Don Blankenship (center) greets supporters Doug Smith and Wanda Smith prior to a town hall in Logan, W.Va., on Jan. 18. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

At an event in West Virginia this month, President Trump was seated between Rep. Evan Jenkins (to his right) and state Attorney General Patrick Morrisey, both of whom are running for the Senate. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Republicans Might Want To Run Away From Trump This Year, But Not In West Virginia

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A member of the West Virginia National Guard works in the basement of the state Capitol in Charleston, W.Va., on secondment to the Secretary of State's office to work on cybersecurity around state elections. Dave Mistich/West Virginia Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Dave Mistich/West Virginia Public Broadcasting

States Turn To National Guard To Help Protect Future Elections From Hackers

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West Virginia teachers, students and supporters hold their signs aloft during a demonstration earlier this month in Morgantown, W.Va. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

West Virginia teachers, students and supporters hold signs on a Morgantown, W.Va., street on Saturday. The strike is in its second weekend after the state Senate failed to pass the 5 percent raise teachers are demanding. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Special needs teacher's aide Belva Perry holds up a sign on Wednesday at West Virginia's Capitol that reads "no deal." John Raby/AP hide caption

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John Raby/AP

Jennifer Hanner, a first-year teacher from Harts, W.Va., holds a sign Thursday at the Capitol in Charleston. Teachers statewide went on strike Thursday over pay and benefits. John Raby/AP hide caption

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John Raby/AP

A House commerce committee investigation found that two drug wholesalers had sent more than 20 million pain pills to two pharmacies in the small town of Williamson, W.Va., seen in 2016. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Terry Lilly, then 36, of Charleston, W.Va., almost a year ago when he was first interviewed by NPR's Sarah McCammon. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

After Drug Treatment, Men In Recovery Work To Live A 'Normal Life'

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President Trump talks with West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice before Justice spoke during a rally Thursday in Huntington, W.Va. Justice said at the rally that he intends to switch parties and rejoin the Republicans. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

A reporter in West Virginia was arrested and charged with a crime on Tuesday after he repeatedly attempted to ask a question of Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Vice President Mike Pence is seen at a rally in January in Washington, D.C., on the National Mall before the start of the 44th annual March for Life. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images