West Virginia West Virginia

At an event in West Virginia this month, President Trump was seated between Rep. Evan Jenkins (to his right) and state Attorney General Patrick Morrisey, both of whom are running for the Senate. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Republicans Might Want To Run Away From Trump This Year, But Not In West Virginia

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A member of the West Virginia National Guard works in the basement of the state Capitol in Charleston, W.Va., on secondment to the Secretary of State's office to work on cybersecurity around state elections. Dave Mistich/West Virginia Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Dave Mistich/West Virginia Public Broadcasting

States Turn To National Guard To Help Protect Future Elections From Hackers

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West Virginia teachers, students and supporters hold their signs aloft during a demonstration earlier this month in Morgantown, W.Va. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

West Virginia teachers, students and supporters hold signs on a Morgantown, W.Va., street on Saturday. The strike is in its second weekend after the state Senate failed to pass the 5 percent raise teachers are demanding. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Special needs teacher's aide Belva Perry holds up a sign on Wednesday at West Virginia's Capitol that reads "no deal." John Raby/AP hide caption

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Jennifer Hanner, a first-year teacher from Harts, W.Va., holds a sign Thursday at the Capitol in Charleston. Teachers statewide went on strike Thursday over pay and benefits. John Raby/AP hide caption

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John Raby/AP

A House commerce committee investigation found that two drug wholesalers had sent more than 20 million pain pills to two pharmacies in the small town of Williamson, W.Va., seen in 2016. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Terry Lilly, then 36, of Charleston, W.Va., almost a year ago when he was first interviewed by NPR's Sarah McCammon. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

After Drug Treatment, Men In Recovery Work To Live A 'Normal Life'

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President Trump talks with West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice before Justice spoke during a rally Thursday in Huntington, W.Va. Justice said at the rally that he intends to switch parties and rejoin the Republicans. Darron Cummings/AP hide caption

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Darron Cummings/AP

A reporter in West Virginia was arrested and charged with a crime on Tuesday after he repeatedly attempted to ask a question of Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Vice President Mike Pence is seen at a rally in January in Washington, D.C., on the National Mall before the start of the 44th annual March for Life. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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