hacking hacking

People vote on on November 8, 2016 in Los Angeles. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Making U.S. Elections More Secure Wouldn't Cost Much But No One Wants To Pay

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Jorge Santiago Aguirre, a human rights lawyer in Mexico City, clicked on a link in a text message he received last year asking for his help. Nothing happened. But days later, audio was leaked of a call between Aguirre and one of his clients. The call had been heavily edited and painted both men as criminals. James Frederick hide caption

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James Frederick

Mexico's Government Is Accused Of Targeting Journalists And Activists With Spyware

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When reporting from Moscow, NPR's Mary Louise Kelly was typing when the cursor began to jump around on its own. Konstantin Leyfer/TASS via Getty Images hide caption

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Konstantin Leyfer/TASS via Getty Images

In this photo dated Aug. 23, 2010, Iranian technicians work at the Bushehr nuclear power plant, where Iran had confirmed several personal laptops infected by Stuxnet malware. Ebrahim Norouzi/AP/International Iran Photo Agency hide caption

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Ebrahim Norouzi/AP/International Iran Photo Agency

The FBI issued a series of "wanted" posters for Russians accused of cybercrimes Wednesday, including Igor Anatolyevich Sushchin, who is alleged to be a Russian Federal Security Service (FSB) officer. Courtesy of FBI hide caption

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Courtesy of FBI

Yahoo says it has notified an undisclosed number of users that their private information may have been accessed using forged cookies in connection with a previously disclosed hack in 2014. Michael Probst/AP hide caption

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Michael Probst/AP

Some workers in low-income countries are choosing bitcoin, a virtual currency powered by blockchain technology, to send money to their families. It's cheaper, faster and doesn't require a middleman. Andrew Baker/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Andrew Baker/Getty Images/Ikon Images

Cybersecurity presents an early challenge for the incoming president, Donald Trump. Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Experts Hope Trump Makes Cybersecurity An Early Priority

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A Yahoo sign at the company's headquarters in Sunnyvale, Calif. The company has announced a hacking of user accounts that happened in 2013, but it says payment card information was not accessed. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

The Nest thermostat is an Internet-connected device. Security technologist Bruce Schneier says that while Internet-enabled devices have immense promise, they are vulnerable to hacking. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Getty Images

Despite Its Promise, The Internet Of Things Remains Vulnerable

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WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange participates via video link at a news conference in October marking the 10th anniversary of the group. Markus Schreiber/AP hide caption

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Markus Schreiber/AP