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Even rappelling from the rafters of the Philadelphia Flyers' arena, swinging to the tender tuneful power of Miley Cyrus' "Wrecking Ball," Gritty can see you. He can see your soul. Len Redkoles/NHLI via Getty Images hide caption

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Len Redkoles/NHLI via Getty Images

Philadelphia is ending a controversial data-sharing contract with Immigration and Customs Enforcement. In recent weeks, protesters have gathered at City Hall to call for the reunification of families separated by the Trump administration's zero-tolerance policy and the abolition of ICE. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Philadelphia Is Ending A Major Contract With ICE

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A sign is posted May 25 in the window of a Starbucks store, in Chicago. Starbucks will close more than 8,000 stores nationwide on Tuesday to conduct anti-bias training for employees. Kiichiro Sato/AP hide caption

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Kiichiro Sato/AP

On 'White Fear Being Weaponized' And How To Respond

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Rashon Nelson speaks as Donte Robinson looks on during an interview with the Associated Press last month in Philadelphia. Their arrests at a local Starbucks quickly became a viral video and galvanized people around the country who saw the incident as modern-day racism. Jacqueline Larma/AP hide caption

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Jacqueline Larma/AP

Rashon Nelson (left) and Donte Robinson say they hope their arrest at a Philadelphia Starbucks one week ago helps elicit change and doesn't happen to anyone else. A video of their arrest, viewed 11 million times, has sparked outrage and protest. Jacqueline Larma/AP hide caption

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Jacqueline Larma/AP

Protesters demonstrate outside a Starbucks in Philadelphia on Sunday, several days after police arrested two black men who were waiting inside the Center City coffee shop. The chain has announced it will close for an afternoon on May 29 for companywide racial-bias training. Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Makela/Getty Images

The engine on a Southwest Airlines plane is inspected as it sits on the runway at the Philadelphia International Airport after making an emergency landing there on Tuesday. Amanda Bourman/AP hide caption

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Amanda Bourman/AP

On Dec. 21, 2017, Trina Singleton holds a photo of her eldest son Darryl who was murdered in 2016. The Philadelphia Obituary Project, a new website, is working to show that homicide victims in Philadelphia are more than statistics. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

The Philadelphia Obituary Project Chronicles Lives Lost To Violence

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Proponents of medically supervised, indoor sites for opioid injection say such places would be much safer than tent encampments like this one — and could help people addicted to opioids transition into treatment and away from drug use. Natalie Piserchio for WHYY hide caption

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Natalie Piserchio for WHYY

Desperate Cities Consider 'Safe Injection' Sites For Opioid Users

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A tour guide on a horse-drawn carriage points outside of Independence Hall in Philadelphia in 2007. One of the city's two horse-drawn carriage companies is closing down and transferring its animals to the city. George Widman/AP hide caption

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George Widman/AP

Firefighters worked on Friday to put out the smoldering fire that blazed across the rooftops of the Barclay Friends Senior Living Community in West Chester, Pa., the previous night. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP
Jenn Liv for NPR

Research Shows Spanish Speakers Take Longer To Learn English. Why?

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Customers line up outside of Little Pete's on Monday, the diner's last day in business. The landmark and pride of Philadelphia will be razed to make way for a luxury hotel. Kimberly Paynter/WHYY hide caption

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Kimberly Paynter/WHYY

Philadelphia Says Goodbye To Little Pete's, An All-Night Dining Icon

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Market-Frankford line trains remain idle at a Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority station in Upper Darby, Pa., just outside Philadelphia, on Nov. 1. Philadelphia's transit strike ended early Monday, as SEPTA said it has reached a tentative, five-year deal with the union. Jacqueline Larma/AP hide caption

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Jacqueline Larma/AP

A train moves along the Market-Frankford Line in Philadelphia on Wednesday. Transit workers went on strike early Tuesday, shutting down bus, trolley and subways that provide about 900,000 rides a day. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP