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gun violence

Dr. Garen Wintemute at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center, says of the new authority given to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: "There's no funding. There's no agreement to provide funding. There isn't even encouragement." Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Protest signs for a "March for Our Lives" rally sit on a table in Murray, Ky., just south of Marshall County. The community here is recovering from a school shooting — and trying to start a conversation about gun violence and gun regulation, in a region where gun ownership is widespread Camila Domonoske/NPR hide caption

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Camila Domonoske/NPR

Phil Sturm, a Realtor who lives in Chevy Chase, Md., will host around 20 students from North Carolina this weekend. Brakkton Booker/NPR hide caption

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Brakkton Booker/NPR

Washington, D.C., Residents House Students Coming In For Gun Control March

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Marysville Pilchuck High School, north of Seattle. In October 2014, a freshman shot five students in the cafeteria, visible in the background. It has been locked and off-limits since the shooting. Martin Kaste/NPR hide caption

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Martin Kaste/NPR

Despite Heightened Fear Of School Shootings, It's Not A Growing Epidemic

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Vince Warner fires an AK-47 with a bump stock installed at Good Guys Gun and Range in Utah. A significant majority of Americans favor outlawing the attachment, according to the latest NPR/Ipsos poll. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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George Frey/Getty Images

NPR Poll: After Parkland, Number of Americans Who Want Gun Restrictions Grows

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Christine Caria in her home, holding a picture of her as a child in Lake Tahoe. It's her "happy place" that she thinks of when traumatic thoughts get into her head. Leila Fadel/NPR hide caption

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Leila Fadel/NPR

Victims Of Las Vegas Shooting: We Need More Help

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Kenneth and Irene Hernandez pay their respects as they visit a makeshift memorial with crosses placed near the scene of a shooting at the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs, Texas. A man opened fire inside the church in the small South Texas community in November, killing and wounding many. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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Eric Gay/AP

Five years ago, Avielle Richman, 6, was shot in her first-grade classroom at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. Jeremy Richman/Courtesy Richman Family hide caption

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Jeremy Richman/Courtesy Richman Family

A Newtown Family's Campaign To Change How We Think About Violence

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More than 30,000 people a year are killed by gun violence, including 50 killed near the Los Vegas strip last month where this makeshift memorial stands. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

What If We Treated Gun Violence Like A Public Health Crisis?

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At a press conference in Japan on Monday, President Donald Trump blamed mental illness, not guns, for the Texas massacre. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Texas Shooter's History Raises Questions About Mental Health And Mass Murder

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