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The Missouri state chapter of the NAACP had issued an advisory of its own in June, urging travelers to "pay special attention while in the state of Missouri and certainly if contemplating spending time in Missouri." h2kyaks/Flickr hide caption

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h2kyaks/Flickr

Attendees stand behind a sign with the NAACP's logo at a 2015 rally in Washington, D.C. The civil rights group is holding its annual convention in Baltimore this year. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

NAACP President Cornell Brooks speaks on the eve of President Trump's inauguration outside Trump International Hotel and Tower in New York on Jan. 19. After three years under Brooks' leadership, NAACP is looking for a new president. Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images

Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., attends a meeting on Capitol Hill on Nov. 29, 2016. President-elect Donald Trump says he plans to nominate Sessions as U.S. attorney general. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Derrick Johnson, president of the Mississippi NAACP, said at a press conference Wednesday that Donald Trump "clings to the hateful and intolerant rhetoric of this country's shameful history — a history that we know all too well." Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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Sarah McCammon/NPR

For Many Black Voters, Trump's 'What Do You Have To Lose?' Plea Isn't Enough

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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at the NAACP National Convention in Cincinnati, Ohio on July 18, 2016. JAY LAPRETE/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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JAY LAPRETE/AFP/Getty Images

Clinton On Police Murders: 'This Madness Has To Stop'

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Benjamin Epstein, director of the Anti-Defamation League, stands on Martin Luther King Jr.'s right in this photo with Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy and Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson, taken June 22, 1963. Abbie Rowe/John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum hide caption

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Abbie Rowe/John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum

Anti-Defamation League Chief Faces Challenge Trying To Renew Civil Rights Activism

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The sign, a private marker placed by the NAACP, and approved by the National Park Service, as it now stands in Army Park. Christopher Blank/WKNO-FM hide caption

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Christopher Blank/WKNO-FM

Do The Words 'Race Riot' Belong On A Historic Marker In Memphis?

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Civil rights activist Myrlie Evers-Williams speaks during the memorial service for the late civil rights leader Julian Bond, who succeeded her as leader of the NAACP, on Tuesday at the Lincoln Theater in Washington. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Civil Rights Luminaries Remember Julian Bond As A Dogged Advocate

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Is Obama Finally Becoming The President African-Americans Wanted?

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Williams is believed to be buried in the Taylor Cemetery in Brownsville, Tenn. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

Tennessee Community Pushes To Reopen 'Civil Rights Hero' Cold Case

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Attorney General Eric Holder speaks at the annual convention of the NAACP in Orlando, Fla., on Tuesday. Holder told the convention that "Stand Your Ground" laws that have been adopted in 30 states should be reconsidered. David Manning/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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David Manning/Reuters /Landov

NAACP President Benjamin Jealous hopes that international pressure might be another weapon against strict new voter ID laws. Here Jealous speaks on Jan. 16 at the South Carolina State House in Columbia, S.C., for Martin Luther King Day. Rainier Ehrhardt/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Rainier Ehrhardt/Reuters /Landov

Ravi Perry

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