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Illegal immigration

Immigrant rights advocates protest then-President-elect Donald Trump's immigration policies last month. A new study shows that more than 60 percent of the people in this country illegally are concentrated in 20 metro areas. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Many large-scale farms rely heavily on immigrant labor. And many farmers are opposed to Donald Trump's strong stance against illegal immigrant. Ryan Anson/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Ryan Anson/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A sign marks the border between Canada and the U.S. near Beecher Falls, Vt. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Police And Illegal Immigration: What Our Neighbors Do

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A century ago, many new immigrants to the United States ended up returning home. And it often took a while for those who stayed to learn English and integrate into American society. Chad Riley/Getty Images hide caption

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Chad Riley/Getty Images

The Huddled Masses And The Myth Of America

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Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio campaigns for Donald Trump in Phoenix in August. Ralph Freso/Getty Images hide caption

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Ralph Freso/Getty Images

A Local Sheriff's Race Is Drawing National Attention And A Hefty Price Tag

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Immigrants from El Salvador, including one who says she is seven months pregnant, stand next to a U.S. Border Patrol truck after they turned themselves in to border agents on Dec. 7, 2015, near Rio Grande City, Texas. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

U.S.-Mexico Border Sees Resurgence Of Central Americans Seeking Asylum

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The family of Kate Steinle is suing San Francisco and two federal agencies over her killing last year. In this 2015 photo are Brad Steinle, Liz Sullivan and Jim Steinle, her brother, mother and father. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

A groups visits Sazon Latino, a restaurant in downtown Hazleton, during the town's September First Friday event, when businesses and restaurants stay open late. That month, the event included a restaurant tour featuring many Dominican restaurants and Mexican bodegas. Chris Adval/Chris Adval Productions hide caption

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Chris Adval/Chris Adval Productions

The Immigrants It Once Shut Out Bring New Life To Pennsylvania Town

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U.S. Immigration Agency Again Drops 'Family Friendly' Detention Centers

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Boys wait in line to make a phone call at the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Nogales Placement Center in Arizona in June. Many of the minors who arrived from Central America last year are now awaiting court hearings to determine if they can stay in the U.S. Ross D. Franklin/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/Pool/Getty Images

Many Unaccompanied Minors No Longer Alone, But Still In Limbo

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Cuban migrants in the waters south of Key West, Fla., on Jan. 1, before being repatriated. The number of Cubans trying to reach the U.S. illegally by sea has surged since the Obama administration announced plans to normalize relations with Cuba. AP/U.S. Coast Guard hide caption

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AP/U.S. Coast Guard

As Rumors Spread, More Cubans Try To Reach The U.S. By Sea

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