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FTX founder Sam Bankman-Fried leaves the courthouse following his arraignment in New York City on Dec. 22, 2022. Bankman-Fried's trial just concluded its second week, with explosive testimony from former girlfriend Caroline Ellison. Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ed Jones/AFP via Getty Images

Criminal mastermind or hapless dude? A look into Sam Bankman-Fried's trial so far

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Caroline Ellison leaves federal court in Manhattan after testifying during the trial of former FTX CEO Sam Bankman-Fried on Oct. 10. Ellison said Bankman-Fried was the main decision-maker and steered her to transfer funds from cryptocurrency exchange FTX to Alameda Research, a financial firm she headed. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

A judge's ruling that Donald Trump committed fraud as he built his real-estate empire could strip the former president of his authority to make major decisions about the future of his marquee properties in New York. Artie Walker Jr./AP hide caption

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Artie Walker Jr./AP

FTX founder Sam Bankman-Fried arrives at the U.S. Federal Court in New York for a hearing on Feb. 16, 2023. As he awaits trial, the disgraced former CEO is defending himself in the court of public opinion. Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images

Disgraced FTX founder Sam Bankman-Fried has another big problem: He won't shut up

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Federal prosecutors with the Department of Justice have charged William and Robert Tierney with pilfering nearly $4 million from conservative political donors by setting up sham political action committees. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Investors in Zhongjin, a wealth-management company that collapsed this month, demonstrate outside a police office in Shanghai's Hongkou district, demanding repayment of their funds. Police later detained one of the demonstrators for distributing protest T-shirts. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Frank Langfitt/NPR

Chinese Investors Reeling After Wealth Management Firm's Collapse

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To protect against fraud, U.S. banks will be issuing credit cards with small computer chips. But some experts say using a PIN to complete a transaction is more secure than a signature. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

U.S. Credit Cards Tackle Fraud With Embedded Chips, But No PINs

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