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Left to right: The trainer demonstrates squats with a chair, pull-ups with a towel wrapped around a banister and jumping jack intervals. Jenna Sterner/NPR hide caption

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Jenna Sterner/NPR

Get Fit — Faster: This 22-Minute Workout Has You Covered

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The NPR staff likes to exercise in several different ways. Cameron Pollack/NPR hide caption

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Cameron Pollack/NPR

A business decision by UnitedHealthcare, the nation's largest health insurance carrier, to drop a popular fitness benefit has upset many people covered by the company's Medicare plans. Mladen Zivkovic/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Zivkovic/Getty Images

Getting physical activity every day can help maintain health throughout your life. Ronnie Kaufman/Larry Hirshowitz/Getty Images/Blend Images hide caption

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Ronnie Kaufman/Larry Hirshowitz/Getty Images/Blend Images

New Physical Activity Guidelines Urge Americans: Move More, Sit Less

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Shaun T attends the Sweat USA America's All-Star Fitness Festival at the Miami Beach Convention Center in 2013. At some live events, thousands of people turn out to work out with the fitness superstar. Gustavo Caballero/Getty Images for Vital Sports & Entertainment hide caption

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Gustavo Caballero/Getty Images for Vital Sports & Entertainment

Fitness Superstar Shaun T: Keys To Workout Motivation Include Fun — And Selfishness

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Older adults who own dogs walk more than those who don't own dogs, and that they're moving at a good clip, a study finds. fotografixx/Getty Images hide caption

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fotografixx/Getty Images

Dog Owners Walk 22 Minutes More Per Day. And Yes, It Counts As Exercise

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'Powwow Sweat' Promotes Fitness Through Traditional Dance

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Simone Biles flies through the air while performing on the balance beam at the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. Dmitri Lovetsky/AP hide caption

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Dmitri Lovetsky/AP

How A 'Sixth Sense' Helps Simone Biles Fly, And The Rest Of Us Walk

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Peloton's New York City cycling studio has a television production facility so that subscribers, using bikes equipped with a waterproof tablet, can ride along at home. Issac James/Courtesy of Peloton Cycle hide caption

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Issac James/Courtesy of Peloton Cycle

Beyond Jane Fonda Tapes: Home Workouts Go Virtual

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Even golfers using a motorized cart can burn about 1,300 calories and walk 2 miles when playing 18 holes. Halfdark/fstop/Corbis hide caption

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Halfdark/fstop/Corbis

Take A Swing At This: Golf Is Exercise, Cart Or No Cart

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Coss Marte started selling drugs at age 13 and by 19, he says, he was making $2 million a year. After serving a prison sentence, he founded a "prison style" fitness boot camp. Justin Fennert/Courtesy of Behind the Stache hide caption

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Justin Fennert/Courtesy of Behind the Stache

From Jail Cell To Studio: Drug Dealer Becomes Personal Trainer

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