trash trash

Garbage lies north of Beirut in 2017, after it washed away from a nearby seaside dump. Beirut and its suburbs generate some 3,000 tons of garbage per day. Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images

Environmentalists Warn Of Mediterranean Pollution From Lebanon Land Reclamation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/575925118/577833747" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A bottle of Misadventure Vodka, which is made out of disregarded baked goods like cake and bread. The southern California distillery reduces food waste while also creating premium vodka. Courtesy of Misadventure Vodka hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Misadventure Vodka

Henderson Island, in the South Pacific, is thousands of miles from any major industrial centers or human communities. But it's filled with trash — more than 37 million pieces of it, researchers say. Jennifer Lavers/University of Tasmania hide caption

toggle caption
Jennifer Lavers/University of Tasmania

Inside Beijing's Gao'antun incinerator plant, garbage piles past the 25-meter (82-ft.) mark inside an arena-sized garbage container where engineers operate giant claws to sift through it. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Rob Schmitz/NPR

The Burning Problem Of China's Garbage

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/515814016/516488500" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Keystone Sanitary Landfill outside Scranton, Pa., is pushing to expand its permit for another 50 years. Local activists concerned about the environmental impact are pushing back. Jessica Kourkounis/Keystone Crossroads hide caption

toggle caption
Jessica Kourkounis/Keystone Crossroads

Trash Backlash: The Battle For The Future Of 2 Pennsylvania Towns

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/481271847/488637641" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Lebanese woman covers her nose as she walks past piles of garbage on a Beirut street. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Hassan Ammar/AP

Amid Political Dysfunction, Beirut Residents Suffer The Stench Of Garbage

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/427535046/427840028" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript