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Charles Brain helps hand harvest grapes in a Shiraz vineyard in the Swartland wine region of South Africa. Lubanzi Wines, which was started by Brain and his partner, Walker Brown, earned its B Corp certification this year. Christopher Grava/Courtesy of Lubanzi Wines hide caption

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Christopher Grava/Courtesy of Lubanzi Wines

Bob Moore, founder of Bob's Red Mill Natural Foods, inspects grains at the company's facility in Milwaukie, Ore. The pioneering manufacturer of gluten-free products invests in whole grains as well as beans, seeds, nuts, dried fruits, spices and herbs. Natalie Behring/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Natalie Behring/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Jewelry shops in Riyadh could be among the businesses to feel the strain after a government edict to replace foreign workers with Saudi ones. Fayez Nureldine /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fayez Nureldine /AFP/Getty Images

Saudi Arabian Businesses Struggle With Rule To Replace Foreign Workers With Locals

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Godwin Ndosi rents out rooms at his parents' house to guests around the world through websites like Airbnb. He's standing with one of his international visitors. Courtesy of Godwin Ndosi hide caption

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Courtesy of Godwin Ndosi

Michael McBrayer tests his blood sugar before eating lunch. He gets supplies he needs to manage diabetes for free as part of a deal between his employer and health insurer. Evan Frost/MPR News hide caption

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Evan Frost/MPR News

Health Insurers Try Paying More Up Front To Pay Less Later

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As Trump And Congress Flip-Flop On Health Care, Insurers Try To Plan Ahead

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Matt Kern harvests wild bull kelp for salsa that he and his partner, Lisa Heifetz, are selling as part of his new business. Courtesy of Matt Kern and Lisa Heifetz hide caption

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Courtesy of Matt Kern and Lisa Heifetz

When Jerry Greeff (left) wanted to retire, he donated his auto shop to a nonprofit. Vernon Shaw was Greeff's right-hand man and was a big part of the reason Greeff couldn't just let the business go. By donating the business, Greeff made sure Shaw and his other employees could keep their jobs. Mary Rose Madden/WYPR hide caption

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Mary Rose Madden/WYPR

Lots Of People Donate Their Cars, But This Owner Donated His Auto Repair Shop

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The hardworking Instant Pot, touted by its fans on social media, is Amazon's top-selling item in the U.S. How it got to No. 1 is a lesson in viral marketing savvy. Grace Hwang Lynch hide caption

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Grace Hwang Lynch

Vladimir Putin, then Russia's prime minister, toasts with ExxonMobil's Rex Tillerson (left foreground) and Igor Sechin (right foreground) outside Moscow in April 2012. Sechin, a close Putin ally, was then deputy prime minister and now serves as CEO of Russian oil giant Rosneft. Alexei Nikolsky/AP hide caption

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Alexei Nikolsky/AP