global warming global warming
Stories About

global warming

As The Biggest Climate Conference Since Paris Ends, What's Accomplished?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/677015755/677015756" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Smog blankets Santiago, Chile, in June. A U.N. report warns that even a 1.5-degree C increase in global temperatures will cause serious changes to weather, sea levels, agriculture and natural eco-systems. Cllaudio Reyes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Cllaudio Reyes/AFP/Getty Images

The champagne grape harvest in northeastern France, like this one near Mailly-Champagne, started early this year due to lack of rain. Francois Nascimbeni/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Francois Nascimbeni/AFP/Getty Images

Champagne Makers Bubble Over A Bumper Crop Caused By European Drought

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/647242663/647329133" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

As the climate warms, drought is killing large numbers of trees in California. Scientists are looking to the past to try to understand how the ecosystems of today may be changing. Ashley Cooper/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ashley Cooper/Getty Images

To Predict Effects Of Global Warming, Scientists Looked Back 20,000 Years

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/643342003/643445940" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Fisherman Darius Kasprzak searches for cod in the Gulf of Alaska. The cod population there is at its lowest level on record. Annie Feidt for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Annie Feidt for NPR

Gulf Of Alaska Cod Are Disappearing. Blame 'The Blob'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/630918766/640077938" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The way cows digest food takes a lot of energy and generates a lot of heat. This makes them lose their appetite and produce less milk. Mose Buchele/KUT hide caption

toggle caption
Mose Buchele/KUT

As Milk Production Cools In Summer, Farmers Try To Help Cows Take The Heat

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/629797247/631089493" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide would lead to a decrease in the nutritional content of many foods, such as rice, seen here growing in Malaysia. Nik Wheeler/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Nik Wheeler/Getty Images

An artist's rendering of the Chicxulub impact crater on Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula from an asteroid that slammed into the planet some 65 million years ago. SPL/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
SPL/Science Source

Asteroid Impact That Wiped Out The Dinosaurs Also Caused Abrupt Global Warming

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/614105843/614195927" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Warmer temperatures are making canola and possibly other brassica seedpods open too early, reducing crop yields. Andrew Davies/courtesy John Innes Centre hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Davies/courtesy John Innes Centre

Smoke from wildfires, like this lingering cloud in Sonoma County, Calif., in October, may be responsible for creating an off taste in wine. George Rose/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
George Rose/Getty Images

Grants funded by the National Science Foundation have seen a drop in the use of the phrase "climate change" in public summaries. Katie Park and Rebecca Hersher/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Katie Park and Rebecca Hersher/NPR

Climate Scientists Watch Their Words, Hoping To Stave Off Funding Cuts

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/564043596/567133979" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Smoke stacks in New Brunswick, Canada, were photographed in 2015. Global carbon emissions are on the rise after holding steady for several years, researchers say. Tony Webster/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Tony Webster/Flickr

Hurricanes in 2012 and 2003 submerged parking lots and park benches, and flooded businesses along Annapolis' Dock Street. City planners estimate that, given the rise in sea level, by 2100 the flood from a once-in-a-hundred-year storm would be almost twice as high as it would be if such a storm hit today. Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Mapping Coastal Flood Risk Lags Behind Sea Level Rise

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/539506529/539825501" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A comprehensive study of air pollution in the U.S. finds it still kills thousands a year, and disproportionately affects poor people and minorities. Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

U.S. Air Pollution Still Kills Thousands Every Year, Study Concludes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/534594373/534765068" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript