Pakistan Pakistan

Friends of Nawaz Atta, a missing activist, accompany his mother at a police station to report the man's disappearance. Atta was taken by armed men in late October. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/NPR

Concern Grows In Pakistan Over Cases Of Disappearance

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Former Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif (center) waves to his Pakistan Muslim League supporters during a party general council meeting in Islamabad this month. Anjum Naveed/AP hide caption

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Anjum Naveed/AP

This still image made from a 2013 video released by the Coleman family shows Caitlan Coleman and her husband, Canadian Joshua Boyle, in a militant video given to the family. AP hide caption

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AP

U.S. Woman And Family Freed After 5 Years In Captivity In Afghanistan

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The point of the game is avoid the matchmaker (the figurine with hands clasped at the front of the photograph). Lucas Vasilko hide caption

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Lucas Vasilko

To Win This Board Game, Keep Away From The Matchmaker

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A Pakistani man and boy walk through floodwaters on Aug. 22, 2010, in the village of Baseera in Punjab. Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Berehulak/Getty Images

The Hidden Cost Of A Disaster? Your Ambition

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Khadija Saddiqi, 22, stands outside her family home with an armed guard who was assigned to protect her by the wife of the chief minister of Punjab. Saddiqi won a case against a classmate who tried to stab her to death in May last year after she ignored his advances. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/NPR

Pakistan's prime minister, Shahid Khaqan Abbasi (shown here Aug. 1), says that U.S. sanctions against Pakistan will only hurt its efforts to fight militants in the region. Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images

Ghulam Siddique, a goat herder from Pakistan's Sindh province, has been forced to increase the price of his goats to offset the rising cost of the animals' feed. Amar Guriro for NPR hide caption

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Amar Guriro for NPR

107-year-old Mirza Naseem Changezi (left) sits with his son Khalid Changezi, 61, at their home in the Old City of New Delhi. Changezi is reputed to be the Old City's oldest resident and says there was never any question of leaving India for Pakistan. The Changezis trace their roots back 23 generations. Furkan Latif Khan/NPR hide caption

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Furkan Latif Khan/NPR

For India's Oldest Citizens, Independence Day Spurs Memories Of A Painful Partition

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People pose in front of Pakistan Independence Day signs in Lahore. The country, created in 1947 as a homeland for South Asia's Muslims, celebrated 70 years of independence on Aug. 14. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/NPR

As Pakistan Marks 70 Years Of Independence, Its Minorities Struggle For Space

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Muslim refugees crowd onto a train as they try to flee India near New Delhi in September 1947. Some 15 million people crossed new borders during the violent partition of British-ruled India. At times, mobs targeted and killed passengers traveling in either direction; the trains carrying their corpses became known as "ghost trains." AP hide caption

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AP

Giving Voice To Memories From 1947 Partition And The Birth Of India And Pakistan

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