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Daniel and Helen Pemberton support the huge solar farm planned in Spotsylvania County. They already have 40 solar panels in their own yard. Jacob Fenston/WAMU hide caption

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Jacob Fenston/WAMU

A Battle Is Raging Over The Largest Solar Farm East Of The Rockies

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At Colonial Williamsburg's garden and nursery, which is open to guests, staff grow items that would have been found in gentry pleasure gardens: herbs, flowers and seasonal greens. Colonial Williamsburg Foundation hide caption

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Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

Alexsis Rodgers, president of Virginia Young Democrats, is one of the disappointed constituents who worked hard to elect some of the officials at the center of the Virginia controversies. Now, Rodgers says, the state Democratic Party must develop diverse leaders before there's another crisis. Joe Russell/Courtesy of Alexsis Rodgers hide caption

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Joe Russell/Courtesy of Alexsis Rodgers

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam places hand over his heart at a funeral for a state trooper Saturday in Chilhowie, Va., during one of his first public appearances since the blackface scandal broke. Steve Helber/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Steve Helber/Pool/Getty Images

Virginia State Leaders Hold On Tight To Office After More Than A Week Of Turmoil

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Chef Ari Coleman calls the news that two top Virginia politicians have dressed in blackface "not acceptable" and "ridiculous." Mallory Noe-Payne/WVTF hide caption

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Mallory Noe-Payne/WVTF

'Racism ... Just Gets A New Face': Virginians React To Leadership Controversies

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A statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee stands at the center of Lee Circle along Monument Avenue in Richmond, Va. The commonwealth of Virginia has a complicated racial history that underpins many of today's political controversies. Salwan Georges/Getty Images hide caption

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Salwan Georges/Getty Images

Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax, D-Va., has not called for embattled Gov. Ralph Northam to resign. Should Northam step aside, Fairfax would become Virginia's second black governor. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/Getty Images

Eyes On Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax As Gov. Northam Resists Calls To Resign

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Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, accompanied by his wife, Pam, speaks during a news conference on Saturday. Northam has resisted widespread calls for his resignation. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

More Democrats Press Va. Gov. Ralph Northam To Resign

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Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, pictured preparing to address a news conference on Thursday, issued an apology for a racist photo on his medical school yearbook page. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

Calls For Resignation As Va. Governor Apologizes for Racist Image In 1984 Yearbook

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A snow plow moves on a snowy Durham, N.C., street on Sunday. Weather Prediction Center forecaster David Roth told NPR this could be a "historic storm" for southwest Virginia and western North Carolina. Jonathan Drew/AP hide caption

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Jonathan Drew/AP

James Alex Fields Jr. was found guilty of killing Heather Heyer in Charlottesville, Va., last year. Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail /AP hide caption

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Albemarle-Charlottesville Regional Jail /AP

Last week J.D. Kleopfer, a state herpetologist, announced the death of a two-headed copperhead snake in Northern Virginia on social media. He said it was a discovery that few of his colleagues have seen. J.D. Kleopfer/Virginia Dept. of Game and Inland Fisheries hide caption

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J.D. Kleopfer/Virginia Dept. of Game and Inland Fisheries