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Soviet aviators with their American colleagues in front of a version of the PBY Catalina aircraft in Elizabeth City, N.C. The U.S. trained Soviet pilots to fly the plane as part of Project Zebra, a secret military program during World War II. Courtesy M.G. Crisci hide caption

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Courtesy M.G. Crisci

North Carolina Town Accepts, Then Spurns Russian Gift

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The USS Carl Vinson (CVN-70), the U.S. Navy's nuclear-powered Nimitz-class aircraft carrier, anchored off the coast in Danang, Vietnam on Monday. Linh Pham/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Linh Pham/AFP/Getty Images

A U.S. Aircraft Carrier Anchors Off Vietnam For The First Time Since The War

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A Navy fighter jet comes in for a landing on the aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson in the South China Sea. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

The U.S. Positions Warships In Tense Asia-Pacific Waters

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A C-2A Greyhound launches from the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan on Nov. 17. Five days later a C-2A crashed into the Philippine Sea. Three sailors were lost at sea. Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Eduardo Otero/AP hide caption

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Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Eduardo Otero/AP

In this image provided by the U.S. Navy, a C-2A Greyhound prepares to land in August. Three remained missing after the same type of plane crashed Wednesday in the Philippine Sea. Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alex Corona/AP hide caption

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Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alex Corona/AP

The USS John S. McCain sails toward a naval base in Singapore in August, the massive dent in its side visible on the right side of the frame. The destroyer had collided with a tanker just hours before — the second such deadly collision involving a U.S. Navy warship in several months. Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Roslan Rahman/AFP/Getty Images

Damage to the USS John S. McCain is visible as the guided-missile destroyer steers toward Changi naval base in Singapore following a collision with the merchant vessel Alnic MC in August. Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Joshua Fulton/AP hide caption

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Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Joshua Fulton/AP

The Hughes Glomar Explorer off the coast of Catalina Island, Calif., in August 1975, a year after its secret CIA mission to raise a Soviet sub that sank in the Pacific Ocean. This was one of the CIA's most elaborate and expensive operations. The CIA has just declassified new documents that show the Soviets were suspicious, but never actually knew what the Americans were doing. AP hide caption

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AP

How The CIA Found A Soviet Sub — Without The Soviets Knowing

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Erin Rehm receives the American flag from Vice Adm. Jan Tighe during the graveside service for her husband, U.S. Navy Fire Controlman 1st Class Gary Rehm Jr. at Arlington National Cemetery on Aug. 16. He was one of seven sailors killed on June 17 when the USS Fitzgerald collided with a cargo ship off the coast of Japan. A Navy report says Rehm helped rescue one of his shipmates. U.S. Army photo by Elizabeth Fraser/Arlington National Cemetery hide caption

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U.S. Army photo by Elizabeth Fraser/Arlington National Cemetery

A Hero's Story From The Scramble To Survive On The USS Fitzgerald

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U.S. Navy Vice Adm. Joseph Aucoin, commander of the U.S. 7th Fleet, speaks during a news conference in June after the USS Fitzgerald collided with a container ship off Japan. Eugene Hoshiko/AP hide caption

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Eugene Hoshiko/AP

Damage to the port side is visible as the guided-missile destroyer USS John S. McCain steers toward Changi naval base in Singapore following a collision with the Alnic MC tanker on Monday. Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Joshua Fulton/AP hide caption

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Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Joshua Fulton/AP

In this July 10, 1945, photo provided by U.S. Navy media content operations, USS Indianapolis (CA 35) is shown off the Mare Island Navy Yard, in Northern California, 20 days before it was sunk by Japanese torpedoes. AP hide caption

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AP

The guided-missile destroyer USS Fitzgerald returns to port after colliding with a merchant vessel in June while operating southwest of Yokosuka, Japan. MC1 Peter Burghart/U.S. Navy hide caption

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MC1 Peter Burghart/U.S. Navy

A TV crew films the damage to the USS Fitzgerald at its port in Yokosuka, Japan, on Sunday. "A number" of missing American sailors have been found dead in flooded areas of the destroyer, the U.S. Navy says. Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images

An unmanned underwater vehicle, or UUV, was deployed by the oceanographic and survey ship USNS Bowditch (seen here in a U.S. Navy file photo) — but it was retrieved by a Chinese navy ship. U.S. Navy hide caption

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U.S. Navy

China Says It Will Return Seized U.S. Underwater Drone In 'Appropriate' Way

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A destroyed vehicle bearing a radar antenna is pictured in the Yemeni port city of Hodeidah on Oct. 13. The U.S. military directly targeted Yemen's Houthi rebels for the first time, hitting radar sites controlled by the insurgents after U.S. warships came under missile attacks twice in four days. Stringer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stringer/AFP/Getty Images

Flight deck crew members position F/A-18 jet fighters for a launch from the USS Truman aircraft carrier stationed in the eastern Mediterranean. The crew members wear different colored jerseys to identify their tasks. Sylvia Poggioli/NPR hide caption

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Sylvia Poggioli/NPR

Even As It Heads Home, Aircraft Carrier Plays Key Role Fighting ISIS

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A Navy pilot who flew with the Blue Angels — some of the group's planes are seen here last September — was killed in a crash southwest of Nashville on Thursday afternoon. Portland Press Herald/Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Portland Press Herald/Press Herald via Getty Images