campaign finance campaign finance

The U.S. Capitol is seen reflected in the windows of the Capitol Visitors Center. As Democrats seek to win the House in this year's midterms, they're relying on an online fundraising platform called ActBlue. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

More than a year after President Trump was sworn in, his inaugural committee said in tax filings that it raised nearly $107 million and spent almost all of the money. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

A vendor sells hats to supporters before a campaign rally for then-candidate Donald Trump in Newtown, Pa. While sales of Trump merchandise helped fund his campaign, large donors increasingly dominate the funding of political campaigns. Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images

Campaign Finance System Of Big Money Now Overshadows Watergate-Era Reforms

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Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens after securing the GOP nomination in August of 2016. Allies of Greitens are using a nonprofit group to advance his legislative agenda. Michael Thomas/AP hide caption

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Michael Thomas/AP

Secretive Nonprofits Back Governors Around The Country

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Roxanne Weber (left) rallies in support of a voter-approved government ethics overhaul in front of the South Dakota Capitol in Pierre last month. Republican Gov. Dennis Daugaard said he supports efforts to repeal and replace the initiative. James Nord/AP hide caption

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James Nord/AP

South Dakotans Voted For Tougher Ethics Laws, But Lawmakers Object

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The state capitol building in Jefferson City, Missouri. Voters will vote on a ballot measure that would end the state's current practice of allowing unlimited campaign contributions and reimpose limits of $2,600 per candidate. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Missouri Voters To Decide Whether To Rein In Unlimited Political Cash

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Conservative donor David Koch in a 2013 file photo. The political network he and his brother, Charles, have created is not backing Donald Trump's presidential bid this year. Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP hide caption

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Phelan M. Ebenhack/AP

Koch Network Building A Senate Wall Against Trump

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