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Whole genome sequencing could become part of routine medical care. Researchers sought to find out how primary care doctors and patients would handle the results. Cultura RM Exclusive/GIPhotoStock/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive hide caption

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Cultura RM Exclusive/GIPhotoStock/Getty Images/Cultura Exclusive

Routine DNA Sequencing May Be Helpful And Not As Scary As Feared

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Giedre (left) and Tal Cohen in March 2013, while Giedre was still healthy. Since then, she's begun having symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. In Giedre's case, the illness is tied to a rare genetic mutation she inherited. Courtesy of Tal Cohen hide caption

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Courtesy of Tal Cohen

Younger Adults With Alzheimer's Are Key To Drug Search

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Screening Tests For Breast Cancer Genes Just Got Cheaper

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Sequencing the genes of a cancer cell turns up lots of genetic mutations — but some of them are harmless. The goal is to figure out which mutations are the troublemakers. Kevin Curtis/Science Source hide caption

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Kevin Curtis/Science Source

Personalizing Cancer Treatment With Genetic Tests Can Be Tricky

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After genetic testing revealed a heightened risk for breast cancer, Angelina Jolie had a precautionary double mastectomy. Alastair Grant/AP hide caption

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Alastair Grant/AP

Angelina Jolie's decision to have a double mastectomy after genetic testing has prompted a discussion about which other tests should be covered. WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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WPA Pool/Getty Images

Each strand of DNA is written in a simple language composed of four letters: A, T, C and G. Your code is unique and could be used to find you. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Anonymity In Genetic Research Can Be Fleeting

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Should a high school student building a DNA model also have his genetic code tested for disease risks? iStockphoto.com hide caption

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