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obesity

Students exercise at a weight-loss summer camp in China's Shandong Province. The government promotes physical activity as the solution to a growing obesity problem. Wang Zhide/VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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Wang Zhide/VCG via Getty Images

The sweetened beverage industry has spent millions to combat soda taxes and support medical groups that avoid blaming sugary drinks for health problems. Melissa Lomax Speelman/Getty Images hide caption

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Melissa Lomax Speelman/Getty Images

If patients are obese, their physicians should refer them to behavior-based weight loss programs or offer their own, a national panel of experts says. Yet many doctors aren't having the necessary conversations with their patients. Tetra Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Tetra Images/Getty Images

A color-enhanced scanning electron micrograph of the surface of the human tongue. Taste buds are shown in purple. Doctors have known that as people pack on the pounds, their sense of taste diminishes. New research in mice suggests one reason why: Inflammation brought on by obesity may be killing taste buds. Omikron Omikron/Getty Images/Science Source hide caption

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Omikron Omikron/Getty Images/Science Source

Enoki mushrooms have been used in Eastern medicine for hundreds of years and are now being studied for their anti-tumor properties. Mary Shattock/Flickr hide caption

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Mary Shattock/Flickr

Mushrooms Are Good For You, But Are They Medicine?

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The challenge comes at a time when many Americans are cutting back on sugar due to obesity and diabetes risks. Courtesy of The Coca-Cola Company hide caption

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Courtesy of The Coca-Cola Company

Coca-Cola Offers A Sweet Quest: A Million Bucks To Replace Sugar

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John Holcroft/Ikon ImagesGetty Images

Yo-Yo Dieting May Pose Serious Risks For Heart Patients

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A family sells pastries in Mexico City. As Mexicans' wages have risen, their average daily intake of calories has soared. Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR hide caption

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Meghan Dhaliwal/for NPR

How Diabetes Got To Be The No. 1 Killer In Mexico

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A new study finds that being overweight may decrease a person's life span. Zena Holloway/Getty Images hide caption

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Zena Holloway/Getty Images

Carrying Some Extra Pounds May Not Be Good After All

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An increasing number of overweight Americans have lost the motivation to diet. enisaksoy/Getty Images hide caption

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enisaksoy/Getty Images

Is Dieting Passe? Study Finds Fewer Overweight People Try To Lose Weight

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A molecular biologist is studying how excess sugar might alter brain chemistry, leading to overeating and eventually, obesity. Veronica Grech/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Veronica Grech/Ikon Images/Getty Images

This Scientist Is Trying To Unravel What Sugar Does To The Brain

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Marlene Simpson of Sacramento, Calif., wears compression bandages daily to help reduce the swelling in her legs. She is getting fitted for compression bandages for her arms to prevent swelling there. Lesley McClurg/KQED hide caption

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Lesley McClurg/KQED

These Women Discovered It Wasn't Just Fat: It Was Lipedema

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