obesity obesity
Stories About

obesity

It's not clear if diet soft drinks are the healthiest choice. ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

toggle caption
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Advice For Diet Soda Lovers: Skip The Chips

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/150514083/150549172" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Studies show that friends and family gain weight — and lose weight — together. Sean Locke/iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption
Sean Locke/iStockphoto.com

Gain Together, Lose Together: The Weight-Loss 'Halo' Effect

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/148330045/148435457" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The FDA hasn't approved a new weight-loss drug since 1999. In the meantime, Americans' waistlines have continued to grow. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

toggle caption
M. Spencer Green/AP

A tax proposal on the table in Massachusetts could discourage sugar consumption a bit by making sugary foods more expensive. Umberto Salvagnin/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Umberto Salvagnin/Flickr

Could Taxes Or Food Stamp Restrictions Tame America's Sweet Tooth?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/146481752/146508000" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Americans eat about 31 pounds of cheese per person each year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. iStockphoto.com hide caption

toggle caption
iStockphoto.com

Billboards Slather On The Guilt With Anti-Cheese Campaign

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/146299792/146305264" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Chefs Jose Andres and Alice Waters pose along side her newly installed portrait, by photographer Dave Woody, at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, on Jan. 20, 2012. John Rose/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
John Rose/NPR

People stroll down a street in Montpelier, Vt., last summer. In 1995, 13.4 percent of Vermonters were considered obese. The figure climbed to 23.5 percent in 2011. The latest national data suggest the obesity epidemic has plateaued, however. Toby Talbot/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Toby Talbot/AP

Obesity Epidemic May Have Peaked In U.S.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/145237480/145359449" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript