golf golf

Takashi Yanaoka, president of the Musashigaoka Golf Course outside Tokyo, says tee times are booked at about 90 percent here. But it bucks an industry-wide downward trend. Becky Sullivan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Sullivan/NPR

Japan Has Half Of Asia's Golf Courses, But The Game's Popularity There Is Flagging

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People attend the 72nd U.S. Women's Open Golf Championship at Trump National Golf Course in Bedminster, N.J., in July. President Trump mentioned the golf course during a speech before South Korea's National Assembly. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Emily Nash, shown on Aug. 8 after winning the Massachusetts Golf Association's WGAM Junior Amateur Championship. This month, in an unrelated high school tournament, Nash was denied a trophy despite her winning score. Courtesy of the Massachusetts Golf Association hide caption

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Courtesy of the Massachusetts Golf Association

Chris Solomon (right), with No Laying Up co-founder Todd Schuster at Royal Lytham & St. Annes Golf Club in England. Somerside Photography hide caption

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Somerside Photography

Long Shot: Moonlighting Golf Blogger Quits His Day Job

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Golfers work on the 16th green during a practice round Wednesday at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J. The U.S. Women's Open Golf Championship starts there today. Joel Rose/NPR hide caption

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Joel Rose/NPR

Some Women's Golf Fans Are Teed Off To See Major Tourney At Trump Course

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Ozzie Ling, manager of Shanghai's Yingyi Golf Club, says government inspection squads will sometimes visit his club, looking for wayward government officials who might be guests of the club. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

China's Government Tightens Its Grip On Golf, Shuts Down Courses

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Donald Trump plays a round of golf after the opening of The Trump International Golf Links Course on July 10, 2012, in Balmedie, Scotland. Ian MacNicol/Getty Images hide caption

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Ian MacNicol/Getty Images

Trump, The Golfer In Chief

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Sergio García of Spain reacts after making his birdie putt on the 18th green to win the Masters golf tournament after a playoff against Englishman Justin Rose on Sunday in Augusta, Ga. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

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Matt Slocum/AP

Hideki Matsuyama, of Japan, watches his tee shot on the 14th hole during a practice round for the Masters golf tournament Tuesday in Augusta, Ga. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

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Matt Slocum/AP

Let's Ring In Spring With The Masters Golf Tournament

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A flag flies on a green lined with villas at the Trump International Golf Club in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The 18-hole golf course bearing Donald Trump's name exemplifies the questions surrounding his international business interests. Kamran Jebreili/AP hide caption

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Kamran Jebreili/AP

Adam Scott of Australia plays during the World Golf Championships-Cadillac Championship at the Trump National Doral Blue Monster course in 2016. David Cannon/Getty Images hide caption

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David Cannon/Getty Images

Arnold Palmer acknowledges the crowd after hitting the ceremonial first tee shot at the 2007 Masters tournament. David J. Phillip/AP hide caption

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David J. Phillip/AP

Golfer Arnold Palmer, Who Gave New Life To A Staid Game, Dies At 87

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Louis Oosthuizen (right) shakes hands with his playing partner, J.B. Holmes, after the final round of the Masters on Sunday. Oosthuizen made an unlikely hole-in-one after his ball smacked Holmes' and then trickled into the cup. Harry How/Getty Images hide caption

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Harry How/Getty Images

That Hole-In-One: The Other Amazing Thing About The 2016 Masters

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Donald Trump played a round of golf after his Trump International Golf Links Course opened in July 2012 in Balmedie, Scotland, near Aberdeen. Ian MacNicol/Getty Images hide caption

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Ian MacNicol/Getty Images

Anti-Trump Voices Grow Louder In Scotland After Development Rift

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