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Southwest Airlines is among the companies that grounded Boeing 737 MAX aircraft because of a software failure that caused fatal crashes of Lion Air and Ethiopian Airlines planes. The FAA said Wednesday it has found a new flaw in the plane that needs to be fixed. Ralph Freso/Getty Images hide caption

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Ralph Freso/Getty Images

At a Senate hearing March 27, Daniel Elwell, acting director of the Federal Aviation Administration, said airline pilots had enough training to handle Boeing's flight control software. But some pilots disagree. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Pilots Split Over FAA Chief's Claims On Boeing 737 Max Training

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Federal Aviation Administration Acting Administrator Daniel Elwell (left), National Transportation Safety Board Chairman Robert Sumwalt, and Department of Transportation Inspector General Calvin Scovel, appear before a Senate Transportation subcommittee on commercial airline safety on Wednesday to discuss two recent Boeing 737 Max crashes. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

FAA Head Defends Agency Actions Following Recent Air Disasters

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Government Calls Back Furloughed Aviation Workers, But Gaps Will Remain

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The Federal Aviation Administration is refusing to regulate the size of airline seats, saying it sees no evidence that filling smaller seats with bigger passengers slows emergency evacuations. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Tired Of Tiny Seats And No Legroom On Flights? Don't Expect It To Change

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Air traffic controllers at Dulles International Airport outside Washington, D.C., are using new technology that lets them exchange digital messages with pilots. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

Air Traffic Controllers And Pilots Can Now Communicate Electronically

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"An Old Walrus, Or 'Morse' " was drawn by Henry Wood Elliott in 1872. He included it in his book Our Arctic Province, next to a description of a walrus haulout in Alaska's Punuk Islands in 1874. Wikimedia hide caption

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Wikimedia

An illustration of the company's landing vehicle on the surface of the moon. Moon Express via AP hide caption

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Moon Express via AP

Florida Company Gets One Bureaucratic Step Closer To Landing On The Moon

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