photography photography

Members of the last large LGBTQ group who joined Diversidad Sin Fronteras and the Refugee Caravan 2018 get ready to seek asylum at the San Ysidro Port of Entry on May 9. Verónica G. Cárdenas hide caption

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Verónica G. Cárdenas

In a full-issue article on Australia that ran in National Geographic in 1916, aboriginal Australians were called "savages" who "rank lowest in intelligence of all human beings." The magazine examines its history of racist coverage in its April issue. C.P. Scott (L) and H.E. Gregory (R)/National Geographic hide caption

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C.P. Scott (L) and H.E. Gregory (R)/National Geographic

Photographer Lorenzo Vitturi assembled this collage of products sold at the street market of Lagos Island, Nigeria, including the T-shirt that gave him the title for his new book: "Money Must Be Made." Lorenzo Vitturi hide caption

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Lorenzo Vitturi

A young white rhino, drugged and blindfolded, is about to be released into the Okavango Delta in Botswana. It was relocated from South Africa to protect it from poachers. Neil Aldridge/World Press Photo hide caption

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Neil Aldridge/World Press Photo

Photojournalist Matt Black has traveled about 100,000 miles across 46 states to document what poverty looks like across the country for his project The Geography of Poverty. This photograph was taken in Sunflower County, Miss. Matt Black/Magnum Photos hide caption

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Matt Black/Magnum Photos

'America From The Bottom': Documenting Poverty Across The Country

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The Sardar Sweet Shop in Varanasi, India, was built around a neem tree considered too holy to cut down. Customers flow in and out, barely noticing the imposing tree. In rural parts, people use the neem tree's leaves to repel insects, the sap for stomach pain and the branches to brush their teeth. As for the candy shop sweets, Diane Cook says they were "fabulous." Diane Cook and Len Jenshel hide caption

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Diane Cook and Len Jenshel

Morzina, a 40-year-old Rohingya refugee from Tangbazar, Myanmar, winces in pain at the Sadar Hospital in the Bangladeshi town of Cox's Bazar. Soldiers from Myanmar's army smashed her in the ribs with a rifle butt as they raided her home in early September. Tommy Trenchard/Panos Pictures hide caption

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Tommy Trenchard/Panos Pictures

Iraq Mihaela Noroc/Courtesy of Ten Speed Press hide caption

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Mihaela Noroc/Courtesy of Ten Speed Press

PHOTOS: A 4-Year Mission To Present A New Vision Of Beauty

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