photography photography

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Albert Raby (left) and Ralph Abernathy at City Hall in Chicago, in 1965. Courtesy of Bernard Kleina hide caption

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Courtesy of Bernard Kleina

When King Came To Chicago: See The Rare Images Of His Campaign — In Color

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"My home," exclaims Movses Haneshyan, on seeing the enlarged image presented to him by photographer Diana Markosian. He'd fled with his father at age 5. Diana Markosian hide caption

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Diana Markosian

Elsa Dorfman and Allen Ginsberg. The inscription on the bottom of the photo reads, "October 15, 1988. The morning after our reception at Vision." Elsa Dorfman hide caption

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Elsa Dorfman

To Access Her Big, Boxy Muse, Photographer Set Her Sights On Allen Ginsberg

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Rice University's FlatCam is thinner than a dime. Jeff Fitlow/Rice University hide caption

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Jeff Fitlow/Rice University

Bulky Cameras, Meet The Lens-less FlatCam

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The photographer brings a surreal touch to the epidemic that struck West Africa in photos titled "Le Temps Ebola." The suits worn by the people portraying health professionals evoke carnival masks and animal masks. The question the photographer ponders: "Are these figures here to protect the people or to harm them?," reflecting mistrust of medical workers in the early stages of the outbreak. Courtesy of Bakary Emmanuel Daou hide caption

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Courtesy of Bakary Emmanuel Daou

On the first day of the Soviet withdrawal from Afghanistan in May 1988, an Afghan soldier hands a flag to a departing Soviet soldier in Kabul. "This was the first time journalists had full access to Kabul," Robert Nickelsberg says. It marked his first year covering Afghanistan. "It was a historical turning point for the Cold War and actually foreshadows the chaos that will descend on the country." Courtesy of Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Courtesy of Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images