Michigan Michigan
Stories About

Michigan

Mysterious Light Still Attracts Tourists, Despite Scientific Explanation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/748565575/748565576" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Michigan has become the first state in the Midwest to legalize recreational marijuana, after voters approved a ballot measure Tuesday. Here, a clerk reaches for a container of marijuana buds at Utopia Gardens, a medical marijuana dispensary in Detroit. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Carlos Osorio/AP

Kristy Taylor baits her hook while fishing on the Two Hearted River in Michigan. She's part of a steelhead fishing class put on by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources in an effort to inspire more women to fish. Morgan Springer/Interlochen Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Morgan Springer/Interlochen Public Radio

Luring More Women To Fishing In The Upper Great Lakes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/663112361/664617157" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Don Skidmore stands in front of a sign for United Auto Workers Local 735, the union chapter he represented as president when he was a General Motors employee. Ari Shapiro/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ari Shapiro/NPR

Life After GM: A Family Upended By Auto Plant Closure Took Divergent Paths

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/662573969/662574658" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Rashida Tlaib (shown in 2008) served as a Michigan state legislator for six years. On Tuesday, Democrats picked her to run unopposed for the congressional seat held by former Rep. John Conyers for more than 50 years. Tlaib would be the first Muslim woman in Congress. Al Goldis/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Al Goldis/AP

New technologies and a changing climate are altering the way apples are grown in places like New York's Hudson Valley and across the country. Jake Rajs/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jake Rajs/Getty Images

A Few More Bad Apples: As The Climate Changes, Fruit Growing Does, Too

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/634135514/635047840" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A couple sits on Belle Isle while looking at the skyline in Detroit, Michigan, in 2017. The city has been released from state oversight of its finances after several years of scrutiny. Anthony Lanzilote/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Anthony Lanzilote/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Below A Michigan Overpass, Truckers Make A Safety Net

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/606598688/606716597" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A water distribution center on Dort Highway in Flint, Mich. Stephen Carmody/Michigan Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Stephen Carmody/Michigan Radio

In Flint, Residents Scramble To Get The Last Cases Of State-Provided Bottled Water

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/601268214/601268215" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Bottled water is packaged for shipment at the Nestlé Water bottling plant in Stanwood, Mich. Steven M. Herppich /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Steven M. Herppich /AFP/Getty Images

The finished edge of a saw blade produced by Simonds International in Big Rapids, Mich. The blades require steel not available from U.S. mills. Aaron Selbig/Interlochen Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Aaron Selbig/Interlochen Public Radio

As U.S. Steelmakers Cheer Tariffs, A Michigan Factory's Future Looks Bleak

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/591384442/591830145" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Two people were fatally shot in a dormitory on the campus of Central Michigan University in Mount Pleasant on Friday morning. They were the parents of a student who was apprehended by police. Rebecca Steward/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Rebecca Steward/Flickr

A car dashcam captures a view of a meteor near Bloomfield Hills, Mich., on Tuesday in this still image from video obtained from social media. Youtube Mike Austin/via Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Youtube Mike Austin/via Reuters

A traditional pot of Yemeni coffee, mixed with cardamom and ginger, is served with a Yemeni sweet honey bread at a new Yemeni coffee shop in Dearborn, Mich. Owner Ibrahim Alhasbani sees himself as part entrepreneur, part cultural ambassador for his home country. Zahir Janmohamed hide caption

toggle caption
Zahir Janmohamed

A trip to Ann Arbor, Mich., wouldn't be complete without a visit to Zingerman's. A new cookbook shares some no-nonsense recipes that seem like they're just an oven-preheat away from appearing warm and fresh in your kitchen. Brittany Greeson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Brittany Greeson/Getty Images

Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder signed legislation on Tuesday creating harsher penalties for doctors, parents and others convicted of female genital mutilation. Above, the state Capitol in Lansing in 2012. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Carlos Osorio/AP

A tart cherry orchard in Michigan. Warmer days in early spring and erratic spring weather have hurt yields in recent years. Still, cherry growers are reluctant to discuss the role of climate change. Peter Payette/Interlochen Public Radio hide caption

toggle caption
Peter Payette/Interlochen Public Radio

Michigan's Tart Cherry Orchards Struggle To Cope With Erratic Spring Weather

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/523004370/523044325" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Miners favored the pasty due to its portable nature — a small meat pie that could easily be carried into the mines for 12-hour workdays. Matt Cardy/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Matt Cardy/Getty Images