media media

Sometimes it can feel like there is a terrorist attack on the news every other week. But how much attention an attack receives has a lot to do with one factor: the religion of the perpetrator. David McNew /AFP/Getty Images David McNew/ AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David McNew/ AFP/Getty Images

Radio Replay: The Weight of Our Words

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/601524253/604443641" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A video from the sports website Deadspin shows local TV news anchors reciting, in unison, a script from Sinclair Broadcast Group denouncing "fake stories." Deadspin/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Deadspin/Screenshot by NPR

The Central African Republic has one of the world's highest neonatal mortality rates: 1 in 24, according to UNICEF. Above: A mother holds her child during a consultation on February 14 at the maternity clinic in the town of Boali. Florent Vergnes /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Florent Vergnes /AFP/Getty Images
Lilli Carré for NPR

Listen: Tristan Harris, founder of Center for Humane Technology, on Morning Edition

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/579554273/583664992" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Trump speaks on Saturday during an event celebrating veterans at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, where he continued his rhetorical attacks on the media. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Carolyn Kaster/AP

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer delivers a statement in the Brady Briefing Room of the White House on Saturday. Mandel Ngan /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mandel Ngan /AFP/Getty Images

Media executives and anchors from the top five TV networks met with the president-elect at Trump Tower on Monday. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Lennihan/AP

Trump Airs Grievances, Fields Questions In Meeting With Top TV News Figures

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/502951630/502980074" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Debate moderators Carl Quintanilla (from left), Becky Quick and John Harwood appear during the CNBC Republican presidential debate on Oct. 28. Most Republican candidates agreed on at least one thing following the debate: "Gotcha" questions have got to go. Mark J. Terrill/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mark J. Terrill/AP