agriculture agriculture

The vines at Pheasant Ridge Winery near Lubbock, Texas, were devastated by drift from the herbicide 2,4-D in 2016. Merrit Kennedy/NPR hide caption

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Merrit Kennedy/NPR

West Texas Vineyards Blasted By Herbicide Drift From Nearby Cotton Fields

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The Feed the Future Tworore Inkoko, Twunguke project hosts a meeting in the Gataraga sector of Rwanda to recruit farmers to grow chickens. If the farmers commit to four days of training and pass a competency test, they are given a backyard coop worth about $625, as well as the means to obtain 100 day-old chicks, vaccines, feed and technical advice. Emily Urban/NPR hide caption

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Emily Urban/NPR

New technologies and a changing climate are altering the way apples are grown in places like New York's Hudson Valley and across the country. Jake Rajs/Getty Images hide caption

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Jake Rajs/Getty Images

A Few More Bad Apples: As The Climate Changes, Fruit Growing Does, Too

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Tens of thousands of people live in villages on the edge of the Ankeniheny-Zahamena Corridor rainforest in Madagascar. A government policy now bans cutting down trees to get more land for farming. Mahesh Poudyal hide caption

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Mahesh Poudyal

Cows stand in a pen at the Skyline Dairy farm near Grunthal, Manitoba, Canada, in March. Trevor Hagan/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Trevor Hagan/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Why President Trump Hates Canadian Dairy — And Canada Insists On Protecting It

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An increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide would lead to a decrease in the nutritional content of many foods, such as rice, seen here growing in Malaysia. Nik Wheeler/Getty Images hide caption

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Nik Wheeler/Getty Images

Georgia's chicken prices were 30 to 50 percent higher than chicken prices elsewhere in 2015. Investors smelled a rat. Rob Lawson/Getty Images hide caption

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Rob Lawson/Getty Images

How Wall Street Brought Down Georgia's Suspicious Chicken Price Index

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The Diamond B Ranch, north of Cheyenne, Wyo., is no longer a working property. It's been bought and subdivided by a realty company. Cooper McKim/Wyoming Public Radio hide caption

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Cooper McKim/Wyoming Public Radio

Rural Lands At Risk As Ranchers Prepare For Retirement

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Deb Gangwish inspects soil on her farm near Shelton, Neb. Dan Charles hide caption

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Dan Charles

A Grass-Roots Movement For Healthy Soil Spreads Among Farmers

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Line workers sort freshly cut avocados at Frutas Finas packing plant in Tancitaro. Forty-five percent of the world's avocados come from Mexico. Eighty percent of avocados consumed in the U.S. come from Mexico, the majority from the small mountain town of Tancitaro. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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Carrie Kahn/NPR

Blood Avocados No More: Mexican Farm Town Says It's Kicked Out Cartels

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Soybean plants, with pods ready for harvest, in Boonsboro, Maryland. Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Edwin Remsburg/VW Pics/UIG via Getty Images

The Soybean Is King, Yet Remains Invisible

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Chip Councell's ancestors began farming on Maryland's Eastern Shore in 1690. He says that in today's world, U.S. farmers have to look abroad for markets. John Ydstie/NPR hide caption

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John Ydstie/NPR

As Trump Moves To Renegotiate NAFTA, U.S. Farmers Are Hopeful But Nervous

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A worker milking cows at a farm in Manati, Puerto Rico, on Thursday. Puerto Rico's dairy farmers account for about a third of the island's total agricultural production. Now they're struggling to recover their cows and get them milked. Courtesy of Manuel Perez hide caption

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Courtesy of Manuel Perez

Puerto Rico's Dairy Industry, Once Robust, Flattened By Maria

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Researchers have won a prize for discovering that a cow's genetics determine which microbes populate its gut. Some of those microbes produce the greenhouse gas methane that comes out of cow belches and farts and ends up in the atmosphere. Charlie Litchfield/AP hide caption

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Charlie Litchfield/AP

At the Cathedral Ridge Winery in Hood River, Ore., smoke has poured into the property and there are worries it could alter the taste of the grapes. Molly Solomon/OPB hide caption

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Molly Solomon/OPB

Fallen fruit sits on the ground below orange trees in Frostproof, Fla., U.S. Hurricane Irma destroyed almost half of the citrus crop in some areas. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images

Not only are kids raising animals and learning the how-tos of vaccinations and record-keeping, 4-H'ers are also being taught how to add up the costs and weigh them against future profits. Darren Huck/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Darren Huck/The Washington Post/Getty Images

In the upper reaches of the northern state of Uttarakhand, small villages are rain- and snow-fed. As snowfall has declined, farmers are starting to plant crops in winter, when fields would usually lie fallow. Julie McCarthy/NPR hide caption

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Julie McCarthy/NPR

As India's Climate Changes, Farmers In The North Experiment With New Crops

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